Rocky Mountain announce new Slayer enduro bike

Designed to lay waste to the world’s roughest trails, the Slayer is back as an all-carbon weapon. From the most aggressive Enduro World Series tracks to bike park laps and big mountain lines, its downhill-bike capability and pedaling responsiveness are matched with an uncanny ability to find and hold speed in rugged terrain. All killer, no filler.

Slayer_790_MSL_Hero.jpg

 

Intended Use: Enduro / All Mountain
Front Travel: 170mm
Rear Travel: 165mm
Wheel Size: 27.5”

 

“I’m super fired up that the Slayer is back,” says team rider Thomas Vanderham. “A few things really stood out to me through the development process—it pedals incredibly well, carries a ton of speed, and that extra bit of travel is awesome when you really want to rally! I see myself spending a ton of time on this bike."

 

 

Details

  • Full Smoothwall™ carbon frame
  • Ride-4™ adjustability chip for precise geometry adjustments
  • All sizes fit one water bottle inside the front triangle
  • Future-proofed to run Di2 and a dropper post concurrently
  • Max type Enduro cartridge bearing pivots with simplified hardware, Pipelock™ rocker link pivot
  • Shock-eyelet bearings for small-bump sensitivity
  • Single-sided chainstay and seatstay pivots for a narrower rear triangle—eliminates heel rub, even with Boost spacing
  • Metric shock, 230x65
  • 1x specific
  • Clearance for up to 27.5x2.5 “wide trail” tires, and compatible with 26+ tires (26x3.0)
  • Full-length internal dropper post and lockout routing. Internal brake routing in the front triangle, internal tube-in-tube shift routing
  • Oversized downtube ports for ease of cable routing
  • New derailleur hanger design reduces hardware complexity
  • Lightweight bolt-on axle saves 35g compared to a traditional Boost axle
  • PressFit BB92 bottom bracket, ZS44 | ZS56 headset
  • Post-mount 180mm rear brake
  • Max chainring size is 36t
  • Sizing: S/M/L/XL
Rocky Mountain Slayer lifestyle 2.jpg

 

Suspension


Our four-bar Smoothlink™ suspension has been tuned to eat up rough terrain and square-edged hits. We also increased the anti-squat values to make sure the bike pedals efficiently—whether you’re sprinting for a transfer stage or grinding towards a backcountry descent.

 

The Slayer features shock-mount bearings for incredible small-bump suppleness. Predictable, efficient, and capable, its rate curve provides good support at sag and a moderate ramp towards the end-stroke.

 

Rocky Mountain Slayer lifestyle 3.jpg

 

Geometry


Rocky Mountain Slayer geometry.png

 

When we decided to bring the Slayer back, we knew it needed the crush-everything-in-its-path attitude of the previous generation while keeping the agility and efficiency that made it a favourite among aggressive trail riders. The updated geometry retains a fairly steep seat-tube angle, while the reach has been extended and the head-tube angle has been slackened.

 

We kept the BB drop neutral and the rear centre quite short to improve cornering, and shortened the seat-tube lengths to make room for the next generation of longer dropper posts.

 

Our Ride-4™ adjustability system was chosen for the Slayer in order to provide precise geometry adjustments while leaving the suspension curve virtually unaffected. The head-tube and seat-tube angles can be changed by just over a degree, and the bottom-bracket can be raised or lowered by 7.5mm. This allows racers to adapt their geometry from track-to-track while keeping shock tuning predictable and simple.

 

Rocky Mountain Slayer lifestyle 4.jpeg

 

Technologies

  • The RIDE-4™ system uses a single chip insert to adjust the geometry on bikes that require more subtle changes. This allows for more precise adjustments and more isolated shock-tuning.
  • Smoothwall™ carbon uses one of the world’s most sophisticated carbon processes to build frames with industry leading stiffness-to-weight, ride quality, and durability. By using rigid internal molds, we are able to perfect the shape of the internal features and eliminate excess materials. We use different types of carbon in specific frame areas to maximize stiffness and impact resistance while minimizing overall weight.
  • Smoothlink™ suspension stays supple yet supportive through a wider range of gears than conventional single pivot or other four-bar suspension configurations. This patented system reduces both pedal-bob and bottom-outs, while allowing us to fine tune variables like braking and climbing traction across a wide range of intended uses.
  • The Pipelock™ collet system expands radially and locks into the frame, creating a wide and rigid pivot stance. Using Pipelock collets lowers front triangle pivot weights while maximizing lateral stiffness.
  • Size Specific Tune™ ensures that riders of all sizes get the right balance of small-bump compliance, mid-stroke support, and end-stroke progressiveness. Our design team does custom shock tunes based on real world field testing, and adjusts each tune for every specific frame size, from S to XXL.

Models


Slayer 790 MSL

 

Slayer790_MSL_C1_Profile.jpg
Rocky Mountain Slayer 790 MSL.png

 

Slayer 770 MSL

 

Slayer770_MSL_C2_Profile.jpg
Rocky Mountain Slayer 770 MSL.png

 

Slayer 750 MSL

 

Slayer750_MSL_C1_Profile.jpg
Rocky Mountain Slayer 750 MSL.png

 

Slayer 730 MSL

 

Slayer730_MSL_C1_Profile.jpg
Rocky Mountain Slayer 730 MSL.png

 

Slayer 790 MSL Frame Only

 


Slayer_790_MSL_Frame_C1_Profile.jpg

Slayer_790_MSL_Frame_C2_Profile.jpg

Rocky Mountain Slayer 790 MSL frame.png




22 Comments

nox1111, Aug 25 2016 09:07

vaderland daai is mooi!

Skott5, Aug 25 2016 09:25

Very Nice !!

 

ccs-62657-0-32301200-1472107938.jpg

Eddy Gordo, Aug 25 2016 09:33

Jor, definitely an option

BigToe, Aug 25 2016 10:08

Mountain flattening machine!!

droenn, Aug 25 2016 10:10

Jesus wept.

no calves, Aug 25 2016 10:18

Its one of those bikes that just looks RIGHT. no matter what the reviews will say you just want it!!

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Aug 25 2016 11:14

WOWZERS. Such clean lines. Love the pivot treatment... 

NicoBoshoff, Aug 25 2016 11:15

Jor, definitely an option

For South Africa?  Really?

NicoBoshoff, Aug 25 2016 11:16

Having said that, I do need to go home to change my trousers now...

NicoBoshoff, Aug 25 2016 11:21

Really would love to know where in SA you ride that you need 170mm at sub-66' head angle?

 

Unless you are primarily a DH rider but don't want / can't have two bikes of course.  Then sure I suppose.  But as an everyday "let's go to Jonkershoek" machine this seems mightily excessive.

 

Still want one though.

Odinson, Aug 25 2016 12:05

Really would love to know where in SA you ride that you need 170mm at sub-66' head angle?

 

Unless you are primarily a DH rider but don't want / can't have two bikes of course.  Then sure I suppose.  But as an everyday "let's go to Jonkershoek" machine this seems mightily excessive.

 

Still want one though.

 

The heart wants what the heart wants.

Eddy Gordo, Aug 25 2016 12:52

Really would love to know where in SA you ride that you need 170mm at sub-66' head angle?

 

Unless you are primarily a DH rider but don't want / can't have two bikes of course.  Then sure I suppose.  But as an everyday "let's go to Jonkershoek" machine this seems mightily excessive.

 

Still want one though.

 

For South Africa?  Really?

See you figured it out on your own

popcorn_skollie, Aug 25 2016 01:03

Ooh...Looks like another club banger. They better hang on when they throw this thing on. Get a little drink on they gonna flip for this Akon ****. You can bank on it. Pedicure, manicure kitty-cat claws. The way she climbs up and down them poles
Looking like one of them putty-cat dolls. Trying to hold my woodie back through my draws.

Headshot, Aug 25 2016 01:18

The weight quoted on Pinkbike is impressive - under 30lbs with pedals so it could be pedaled around like many other enduro bikes, many of which have similar angles and travel. The relative flatness of our terrain hasn't put off many buyers of other "big" bikes here so the same will apply to this one no doubt.

 

I only use the 160mm I have on tap about 10% of the time, but that 10% is what makes my rides proper fun and not some mundane fitness exercise. Like the chaps doing laps I saw while out on my green belt ride yesterday on their marathon and HT bikes..

NicoBoshoff, Aug 25 2016 01:18

Ooh...Looks like another club banger. They better hang on when they throw this thing on. Get a little drink on they gonna flip for this Akon ****. You can bank on it. Pedicure, manicure kitty-cat claws. The way she climbs up and down them poles
Looking like one of them putty-cat dolls. Trying to hold my woodie back through my draws.

dafuq??

Rocket-Boy, Aug 25 2016 01:20

It cant be very good, its not really a vertical shock, slightly angled so it must suck.

NicoBoshoff, Aug 25 2016 01:30

The weight quoted on Pinkbike is impressive - under 30lbs with pedals so it could be pedaled around like many other enduro bikes, many of which have similar angles and travel. The relative flatness of our terrain hasn't put off many buyers of other "big" bikes here so the same will apply to this one no doubt.

 

I only use the 160mm I have on tap about 10% of the time, but that 10% is what makes my rides proper fun and not some mundane fitness exercise. Like the chaps doing laps I saw while out on my green belt ride yesterday on their marathon and HT bikes..

No sure.  I'm sure it won't be a dog, but there is still a lot to be said for efficiency.  There's a point where you sacrifice too much of it for the sake of being able to hit that one line.

Skott5, Aug 25 2016 01:46

dafuq??

Smack that ... 

popcorn_skollie, Aug 25 2016 01:47

Smack that ... 

Yes I would

Bizkit031, Aug 25 2016 02:36

That is haaawt!!

ridin dirty, Aug 25 2016 04:01

Very slick!

BSG, Aug 28 2016 10:47

Wow, that yellow and black frame colors is awesome