Titan Racing Launch Alloy Versions of Their 100mm & 120mm Full-Sus

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Press Release


In 2019 Titan Racing launched their much anticipated new full-sus, the Cypher, a fully-fledged racing bike with enough flair to tear up the descents and power through the climbs.

 

A 24-month project for Titan Racing, the Cypher, was well received and their carbon variants were sold with ease. An aluminium version has been in the pipeline for some time and was due to hit dealers early this year however, due to Covid-19 unexpected delays arose, and the stock has only landed much later than anticipated.

 

The idea behind the aluminium Cypher was to provide an equivalent ride-feel as their carbon Cypher and further deliver it in a more affordable package. To achieve this Titan Racing went back to the drawing board and designed the new aluminium frame around the same kinematic and geometry foundation as their carbon bike. A feat not as easy as it seems when comparing 2 different materials for construction. The carbon variant has been a success and we have seen it raced to many a podium via their young Valley Electrical Titan Racing Team, so the commitment to the development of the aluminium version has been just as keen. The end result is a race-ready xc/marathon bike that further rivals its' competitors in ride quality, build quality, and price.

 

With consumers on an infinite quest to get more bang for their buck, Titan Racing have really pushed hard to get the most value out of this new aluminium range whilst still delivering a bike that looks and feels at home on the start line. It is with no doubt that mountain bikers will take a keen interest on the new range of aluminium Cyphers.

 

 

THE BIKE

 

Structurally the new aluminium Cypher uses hydroformed ultra-lightweight X6 aluminium with smooth welding at key intersections. Aesthetically the frame has the same lines as its’ carbon counterpart and the headtube and seat gusset have been smoothed out to give an illusion of a weld-free frame. A neat feature here is the headtube that resembles their newly launched aluminium hardtail, the Drone, which is a design element that can be found throughout the brands product offerings. Further, a threaded BB has been used just like the carbon version for ease of maintenance, double row bearings fill all key pivot junctions for added stiffness, as well as a Boost 148 rear thru-axle to finish off the rear end. This delivers a beefy package that is both lightweight and extremely durable.

 

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As with the carbon variants the geometry is progressive and on trend. The Cypher RS boasts a 69° head angle with the flip chip in the high position and 68.5° in the low. The 120mm Cypher runs a 68° head angle with the flip chip in high, and a 67.5° in low. Reach on a large is 460mm, and the whole range benefits from a shorter stem/wider bar combo cockpit.

 

Both the aluminium Cypher & Cypher RS feature a flip-chip which adjusts the geometry half a degree on the head angle and six millimetres on the BB, and internal cable routing for a dropper post, all gear shift cables, rear brake, and a rear remote lockout. Boost rear-axle spacing allow tire clearance of up to 2.35 inches letting you reap the benefits of larger volume tires. The frame has been designed with a low stand over height allowing the rider more control in those technical sections, and 2 water bottles comfortably fit inside the front triangle. A real must have for anyone wanting to race or do longer rides.

 

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The difference between the Cypher RS and the Cypher is the latter having 20mm's extra travel. In addition to this the Cypher features 780mm riser bars, 2.35" tires and a 125mm Manic dropper post compared to the RS variant with 750mm bars, 2.25" tires, and no dropper post. Both offerings are readily capable to take on a multitude of terrains and events with the choice being the riders to match their preferred style of riding; racing snake or trail shredder.

 

OPTIONS

  • The new aluminium Cypher range is available in six colour/spec options.
  • The Cypher RS 100mm comes in the Elite at the highest price point, followed by the Comp, Expert and a ladies version the Calypso Expert.
  • The Cypher 120mm version comes in two options, the Comp and the Expert.

 

 

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CYHER RS ELITE
RRP R39 999-00
Titan Racing - M20 Cypher RS Alloy Comp.jpg
CYPHER RS COMP
RRP R31 999-00

 

Titan Racing - M20 Cypher RS Alloy Expert.jpg
CYPHER RS EXPERT
RRP R27 999-00
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CYPHER RS CALYPSO EXPERT
RRP R27 999-00

 

Titan Racing - M20 Cypher 120 Alloy Comp.jpg
CYPHER COMP
RRP R32 999-00
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CYPHER EXPERT
RRP R28 999-00

 

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ABOUT THE CYPHER & CYPHER RS

 

The Cypher and Cypher RS is a short travel bike based on the metric shock standard. Using a metric standard shock allows for the design of two travel variations using the same frame by taking advantage of the ability to adjust the stroke length of the shock without affecting the eye-to-eye dimensions. A difference of 7.5mm on the stroke translates into 20mm of travel at the rear axle resulting in two variants; the 100mm Cypher RS which has a 37.5mm stroke length while the Cypher has a 45mm stroke.

 

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The decision to include a flip-chip into the design expands the riding capabilities of the Cypher and Cypher RS, enabling the ability to customise the geometry to the preference of the rider for trail conditions. In the low position, the head angle is reduced by half a degree, and the BB drops by 6mm.

 

A gently progressive leverage ratio is balanced between the ability to resist harsh bottom outs while still allowing the full use of travel. Progressive means that more force needs to be applied the further into the travel the rear axle moves in order to compress the shock – this makes for a supportive ride feel that is stable and composed. The leverage rate has been optimised so that it is not overly progressive, allowing for full use of travel. Anti-squat figures have been calculated to function optimally around 85-115% on 32T – 34T chainrings, those being the most popular size for 12-speed drive systems.

 

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VERDICT

 

Titan Racing is a brand focused on the consumer and they set out to offer customers more than just another bike. They strive to offer next level products at fair value money where they aim to improve their customers riding experience. Their designers look to create frames with forward thinking geometry, functional designs and stylish looks. They pair this with clever part choices to allow the best in category bikes for their customers. They call this the SMART Choice.

 

The new aluminium range definitely fits this brief and the Cypher & Cypher RS will be the answer to many a consumers question of which bike next.

 

 

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32 Comments

DR ◣◢, Oct 19 2020 09:54

That’s very impressive value for money right there.

Spafsack, Oct 19 2020 10:15

Very nice, what do these new alu versions weigh in at?

DieselnDust, Oct 19 2020 06:41

wow its amazing what can be achieved when you set out to create a true value offering and not just an entry level bike

Showtime, Oct 19 2020 08:18

Very impressive.

 

Titan aren't nearly as a big a player as Trek, Spez etc so if they can offer the build kits they do maybe people are allowed to call out a R90k Trek with NX.

 

The question is now very much why not a Titan. I could find no reason and took my new Cypher (Carbon) for it's first ride this weekend and I'm very happy with my choice. There is no compromise on build quality or design, it simply offers much more for less.

Dr.Drey, Oct 21 2020 06:52

I bought the Cypher120mm recently.Very satisfied with parts and execution of bike.Value for money Trail/XC mtb.

Shebeen, Oct 21 2020 11:23

Very nice, what do these new alu versions weigh in at?

my first ????? too

not even frame weights?

 

build spec on the expert is decent but wiht quite a few titanR components so i'd expect they wouldn't be that heavy. if it's not stated it can't be good

 

edit: found it here

https://bikenetwork....te-cypher-comp/

The Titan Racing Cypher RS Elite model retails for R39 999. Our test bike weighed 13.1kg with sealant and no pedals.

DieselnDust, Oct 21 2020 11:58

That's a bit disappointing

Spafsack, Oct 21 2020 12:42

13.1KG.....Not bad but not great either, and 40k is still 40k. Mmmm, 

Danger Dassie, Oct 21 2020 03:17

Alloy frame with that build kit, difficult to find something along the same lines.

JasperNel, Oct 21 2020 04:29

my first ????? too
not even frame weights?

build spec on the expert is decent but wiht quite a few titanR components so i'd expect they wouldn't be that heavy. if it's not stated it can't be good

edit: found it here
https://bikenetwork....te-cypher-comp/

The Titan Racing Cypher RS Elite model retails for R39 999. Our test bike weighed 13.1kg with sealant and no pedals.

Will probably not be a problem for everyone but for those a bit OCD.

I was a bit disappointed to see SRAM brakes paired with the Shimano XT/SLX drivetrain.

Then a Rockshox SID fork paired with a X-Fusion rear shock.

I'll 100% admit that I am being critical but I guess one does buy a new bike based on what it looks like as well.

I looked at the bike in a shop and the XL version came in at around 13.8 kg and I think that is a good weight for the spec level.

Looks like a fun bike but would have loved the Shimano brakes and Rockshox rear shock like the Cypher elite Carbon

dseenya, Oct 22 2020 08:38

It's a shame the alloy cypher 120 has such spindly forks. A 34mm or 35mm stanchion option would be nice. 

Jewbacca, Oct 22 2020 08:44

Alloy frame with that build kit, difficult to find something along the same lines.

The Giant Trance 1 29 2019 with 115mm travel rear and 130mm front, 34mm stanchion forks etc came in at 13.1kg factory standard and I believe can be picked up now for a similar price...

 

I've been looking to sell all my bikes and buy 1 road, 1 mtb so looking at 'the one bike' options currently.

Showtime, Oct 22 2020 08:54

A 32mm 120mm fork is not a noodle no matter how popular that saying has become. I have a 120mm 32mm SID and I was open minded about changing to a 34mm version but the fork feels really good as is so I won't be bothering.

It's a shame the alloy cypher 120 has such spindly forks. A 34mm or 35mm stanchion option would be nice.

dseenya, Oct 22 2020 08:58

I think those Manitou Markhors are 30mm stanchions. A 120mm trail bike really needs something beefier than that. I can understand the xc one being 32mm, but 34/35mm is the norm for a trail bike.

A 32mm 120mm fork is not a noodle no matter how popular that saying has become. I have a 120mm 32mm SID and I was open minded about changing to a 34mm version but the fork feels really good as is so I won't be bothering.
 

Showtime, Oct 22 2020 08:59

The Giant Trance 1 29 2019 with 115mm travel rear and 130mm front, 34mm stanchion forks etc came in at 13.1kg factory standard and I believe can be picked up now for a similar price...

I've been looking to sell all my bikes and buy 1 road, 1 mtb so looking at 'the one bike' options currently.


When looking at 2021 models a Spark 960 costs R45k and weighs in at 14.5kg.

YaseenEnos, Oct 22 2020 09:15

i was looking at these bikes in particular the non RS version i.e 120m bikes.

 

2 things turned me down.

 

1) 30mm stanchion fork

 

granted little experience with 120mm thin forks but i agree with what most have said that 120mm forks should have beefier forks. 

 

wonder what the cost would have been if they spec a revelation or RS35 (or even a 32mm RS Reckon) and maybe downgrade the groupset to a Deore.

 

2) x-fusion shock

based on international reviews i have read, reliability came into question and thus turned me away.

PhilipV, Oct 22 2020 09:22

A 32mm 120mm fork is not a noodle no matter how popular that saying has become. I have a 120mm 32mm SID and I was open minded about changing to a 34mm version but the fork feels really good as is so I won't be bothering.

I have a 120mm Reba (32mm stanchions,) and a 150mm Pike (35mm stanchions.)
There is a chalk and cheese difference that becomes apparent when you ride both. Okay, on gravel roads the 32mm forks are fine, but when it gets fun, you feel the flex.
In this case, ignorance is bliss.

There is not a snowballs chance in hell that I'd spend money now on a 32mm fork longer than 100mm.

Showtime, Oct 22 2020 09:34

I have a 120mm Reba (32mm stanchions,) and a 150mm Pike (35mm stanchions.)
There is a chalk and cheese difference that becomes apparent when you ride both. Okay, on gravel roads the 32mm forks are fine, but when it gets fun, you feel the flex.
In this case, ignorance is bliss.

There is not a snowballs chance in hell that I'd spend money now on a 32mm fork longer than 100mm.

I'm sure it's better, it just doesn't make the 32 a 0/10 fork. My previous bike had a 100mm Reba and the new one a 120mm SID with Charger damper. When the going gets fun the SID also feels chalk and cheese compared to the Reba. So for now I'll gladly take the ignorance and enjoy the new SID.

A few years back people were raving about 32mm 130/140 revelations. Then when that became 35 the old one was suddenly a useless noodle. I don't buy into this.

I'm also 70kg for what it's worth.

PhilipV, Oct 22 2020 09:43

I'm sure it's better, it just doesn't make the 32 a 0/10 fork. My previous bike had a 100mm Reba and the new one a 120mm SID with Charger damper. When the going gets fun the SID also feels chalk and cheese compared to the Reba. So for now I'll gladly take the ignorance and enjoy the new SID.

A few years back people were raving about 32mm 130/140 revelations. Then when that became 35 the old one was suddenly a useless noodle. I don't buy into this.

I'm also 70kg for what it's worth.

True, the 32mm stanchions didn't become bad overnight, that is why I still have mine. But I won't buy a new 120mm or more bike with 32mm stanchions. No chance. that is what dsenya noted.

YaseenEnos, Oct 22 2020 09:53

A few years back people were raving about 32mm 130/140 revelations. Then when that became 35 the old one was suddenly a useless noodle. I don't buy into this.

I'm also 70kg for what it's worth.

 

havent been in the game as long an many but my thoughts on this.

 

perhaps mountain biking or rather trail riding has become more technical over time? riders becoming more skilled and pushing the boundaries as time passes and this has exposed the short comings of thinner stanchions?

 

or

 

being exposed to  thicker stanchions just made past experience with thinner forks feel like chalk and cheese.

 

its like comparing a new car to a much older one.(same model) Probably would notice the difference in ride quality, comfort, features  etc. 

 

I do agree though that a good 32mm stanchion fork like a SID or even a Reba is plenty stiff enough for 99% of us.

 

Just questioning the 30mm Manitou

Showtime, Oct 22 2020 10:00

Sorry if I'm coming across as argumentative. You have a good point.

While I feel that 34mm forks are great we are discussing them in a context of a 2021 R33k bike and I'm seeing bikes up to R45k with 30mm Judy forks.

140kw is a nice baseline for a car but we can't demand it from a Figo

havent been in the game as long an many but my thoughts on this.

perhaps mountain biking or rather trail riding has become more technical over time? riders becoming more skilled and pushing the boundaries as time passes and this has exposed the short comings of thinner stanchions?

or

being exposed to thicker stanchions just made past experience with thinner forks feel like chalk and cheese.

its like comparing a new car to a much older one.(same model) Probably would notice the difference in ride quality, comfort, features etc.

I do agree though that a good 32mm stanchion fork like a SID or even a Reba is plenty stiff enough for 99% of us.

Just questioning the 30mm Manitou

Showtime, Oct 22 2020 10:11

I finally see the light. Why is there not a more capable 120mm in the lineup to close the gap to the carbon comp model which has 34mm fork.

They should really make that build kit in Alu.

RaymondC, Oct 22 2020 01:29

That's a bit disappointing

The problem with the SA market is they always go for the lightest instead of most capable. 
I had this discussion over the weekend... "Ya but a dropper makes your bike heavy." I'm going with the dropper BTW.

DieselnDust, Oct 22 2020 02:25

The problem with the SA market is they always go for the lightest instead of most capable. 
I had this discussion over the weekend... "Ya but a dropper makes your bike heavy." I'm going with the dropper BTW.

 

 

A dropper isn't a given in SA. In Cape Town ya there's a case for it but in JHB?? Doubt it.

For newbies it should be a stock item on entry to mid level bikes.

Wimmas, Oct 22 2020 04:13

I would still rather go for a Silverback Stratos AL1 or Giant Trance 2 in the R40k price bracket. Good resale value as well especially on the Giant.

Not yet fully convinced by Titan. Also don't understand the SRAM brakes and X-Fusion rear shock... If it was still a Rock Shox or Fox rear shock and Shimano Deore brakes I would've considered it.