Review: 2021 Specialized S-Works Epic

It has been just three years since the launch of the previous Epic but Specialized's engineers have not been idle. The all-new 2021 Epic boasts a complete rethink on the bike's geometry as well as changes to the Brain system to improve reliability and extend service intervals.

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-2.jpg

 

Updated Geometry


The greatest impact on how the new Epic rides can be attributed to the shape of the frame.

 

Using an alloy test mule frame, Specialized’s engineers tested a variety of different angles and heights when developing the new Epic. They went pretty extreme in some cases, like trying out the bike with a 65 degree head angle. Ultimately they settled on 67.5 degrees for the Epic which is full 2 degrees less than the previous Epic. The slacker head angle should help the bike better roll over obstacles and give the rider more confidence without the fear of pivoting over the handlebars. The chainstay length has been shortened by 5mm which should help with rear end manoeuvrability. The seat tube angle is steeper at 75.5 degrees on a medium frame while the bottom bracket is lower by 8mm to improve handling and offers better control on steep climbs. While the seat tube and bottom bracket heights work to place the rider more inside the frame, the reach on a medium frame is 12mm longer at 445 mm to add a bit more room. The XL frame gets 20mm more reach while the extra small 5mm. Take a look at the full geometry chart below.

 

EPIC.jpgThe new Epic's geometry number alongside a comparison of the new Epic frame versus the previous Epic frame.

 

Improved Construction and Weight


The new S-Works FACT 12m carbon chassis is around 100 grams lighter than the previous model. Specialized used a new layup while adding carbon in some places they could also reduce the amount in others. The carbon suspension link weighs a mere 24 grams. Feedback from team riders indicated a hint of softness in the rear. They looked at the suspension but this wasn’t moving much so they targeted the frame’s rear end stiffness. This resulted in a 15% improvement in stiffness for the back of the frame. The new FACT 11m frames used through the rest of the model range have seen improvements too. They now match the stiffness and weight of the previous S-Works frame.

 

The FACT 12m frames weigh 1869 grams while the FACT 11m frames weigh 1947 grams. These measurements include frame, shock, hanger, axle, and bolts.

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-8.jpg
The engineers at Specialized were pretty excited about getting this carbon link down to 24 grams.

 

Optimized Sizing


A consideration for short and tall riders. Specialized go to great lengths to make sure the experience across the size curve is uniform. They optimise the carbon layup and stress test each frame size to ensure that they each perform the same. It may or may not be attributable to this attention to detail but as a rider who fits an extra-large frame, the Specialized XL always feels just right. It is noticeable when a bike company has simply sized up their test size without much thought.

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-23.jpg
From a distance the paint work looks like a solid colour but up close you can see the brush stroke-like details.

 

Maintenance and Frame Protection


With electronic shifting, our S-Works test arrived with an internal routing cable port for only the rear brake. This can be increased three or four ports to accommodate further shifter and dropper post cables. There is a hole for a rear shock lockout but with the Brain suspension, that’s intended more for the EVO model. The bottom bracket is BSA 73mm, so it’s threaded for easier maintenance. The chainstay protector features the raised sections first seen on the Stumpjumper and they work exceptionally well to rid the bike of any chain slapping sound.

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-5.jpg

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-6.jpg
Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-18.jpg
Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-3.jpgA SWAT box can be fitted to the Epic for additional storage capacity.

 

Hydration and Storage


Of serious importance to marathon racers is hydration and storage for spares. The Epic frame accommodates two full-size bottles across the size curve, except for the extra small frame which can accommodate one bottle on the downtube. The Specialized bottle cage allows for a multitool to be fitted or you can go the full hog and fit the SWAT box which will carry a tube, CO2 canister and adaptor, as well as a tyre lever. Neatly stowed in the headset cap is a chain link and chain breaker tool for repairing a broken chain.

 

The Brain


When you think Specialized Epic you think Brain suspension. While the new EVO has shed its Brain, the racing Epic is still firmly designed around the system.

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-7.jpg
Part of the Brain system is now housed within the non-drive side chainstay.

 

A quick explainer for those unfamiliar with the Brain suspension. The Brain system uses an inertia valve to differentiate between pedalling and trail forces through the rear wheel. This allows it to maintain a firm suspension when on smooth surfaces and automatically switch to open suspension when the trail gets rougher. It’s a simplified lockout that frees up the rider to concentrate on other aspects of racing and never get caught in the wrong setting.

 

Chatting to the Specialized engineers on a video call, they are conscious of the disadvantages of being locked into proprietary suspension and acknowledge that there were some issues with the last iteration of the Brain.

 

The first improvement has to do with the frame rather than the Brain directly. They reduced the side load on the shock by 30% with the new frame design. This improves the performance by reducing stiction but it also prevents air from leaking into the system. They also made a change to the shock with a strong shaft and double barrel bushing on the front and rear to further secure the air sleeve.

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-11.jpg
Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-12.jpg
While the frame has been improved to reduce lateral forces on the shock, the shock has also been beefed up for better performance and reliability.

 

Going deeper into the technical changes, Specialized has dropped the air bladder and returned to the internal floating piston (IFP). The air bladder allows for a wider suspension range than the IFP does but now with the Epic EVO using a unique suspension design, the Epic is focussed purely on racing so the IFP is back in favour.

 

New Brain Internals.jpg

 

To make sure this new system is more reliable, Specialized has put in 1850 hours of real-world testing. That’s the equivalent of 72 Cape Epics at the winner’s pace.

 

Increased service intervals and Service Package


With these improvements to the Brain system, Specialized has significantly extended the service intervals. The air sleeve service window has been boosted from 50-hour to 125-hour intervals and the damper service is now 50 hours later at 250-hour intervals. They have also included a two-year suspension service package for all new Epic buyers.

 

RockShox SID Ultimate SL with Position-Sensitive Brain Damper


The all-new RockShox SID Ultimate SL on the S-Works Epic features a Brain Damper. Like the rear Brain system, an inertia valve works to open the fork damper when triggered by trail input while remaining high in the travel under rider loads. The Position-Sensitive Brain damper allows the fork 15mm of free travel for grip and comfort on smaller bumps. This can be tuned between 0 and 30mm into the travel.

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-19.jpg
Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-20.jpg

 

The Components


Our test bike is the top-tier S-Works model so it boasts the latest and greatest parts available and they all function superbly. That said, there is one standout component on the new S-Works Epic.

 

Control SL Wheels

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-13.jpg

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-15.jpg
Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-14.jpg

 

Specialized recently announced their latest version of the Control SL wheelset. These wheels are fitted to the S-Works model but as one of the highlights on the bike, well worth a mention. The claimed weight challenges even the best road wheels at 1,240 grams. That’s with an internal rim width of 29 millimetres. The hookless rim wall has been thickened to 4 millimetres and shaped to increase strength but also to reduce the chance of pinch flats by 22%. The hubs are DT Swiss internals with sealed ceramic bearings.

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-4.jpg

 

Drivetrain: SRAM Eagle AXS groupset including a Quarq XX1 Dub power meter as a standard component.

 

Brakes: The brakes are SRAM’s Level Ultimates with CLX rotors (180mm front and 160mm rear).

 

Cockpit: The cockpit is full S-Works with a carbon handlebar and seat post. The bike now comes with an S-Works Power saddle instead of the Phenom of the previous bike.

 

Tyres: The tyres are Specialized’s own FastTrak with the Control casing at 2.3” wide.

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-24.jpg

 

  • FrameS-Works FACT 12m Carbon, Modern XC Race Geometry, Rider-First EngineeredTM, threaded BB, 12x148mm rear spacing, internal cable routing, 100mm of travel
  • SwatSWAT EMT Cage-Mount Tool
  • Rear ShockRockShox-Specialized BRAIN, Rx XC Tune, 5 Position Platform Adjust, Rebound Adjust, Integraded Extension, 265x52.5mm
  • ForkRockShox SID SL ULTIMATE BRAIN, Top-Adjust Brain damper, Debon Air, 15x110mm, 44mm offset, 100mm Travel
  • StemS-Works SL, alloy, titanium bolts, 6-degree rise
  • HandlebarsS-Works Carbon XC Mini Rise, 6-degree upsweep, 8-degree backsweep, 10mm rise, 760mm, 31.8mm
  • GripsSpecialized Trail Grips
  • Front BrakeSRAM Level Ultimate, 2-piston caliper, hydraulic disc
  • Rear BrakeSRAM Level Ultimate, 2-piston caliper, hydraulic disc
  • Rear DerailleurSRAMXX1EagleAXS
  • Shift LeversSRAM XX1 Eagle AXS, trigger, 12-speed
  • CassetteSRAM XG-1299 Eagle, 10-50t
  • ChainSRAM XX1 Eagle
  • CranksetQUARQ XX1 Eagle Power Meter, BoostTM 148, DUB, 170/175mm, 32t
  • ChainringsSRAM Eagle 32T alloy, 104 BCD
  • Bottom BracketSRAMDUB,BSA73mm,Threaded
  • RimsRoval Control SL, Carbon offset design, 29mm internal width, 4mm hook width, Tubeless ready, 24h
  • Front HubRoval Control SL, DT Swiss Internals, Ceramic Bearings, 6-bolt, 15mm thru-axle, 110mm spacing, Torque caps, 24h straight pull t-head
  • Rear HubRoval Control SL, DT Swiss 180 Internals, DT Swiss Ratchet EXP, Ceramic bearings, 12mm thru-axle, 148mm spacing, 24h
  • SpokesDT Swiss Aerolite T-head
  • Front TyreFast Trak, Control casing, GRIPTON® compound, 60 TPI, 2Bliss Ready, 29x2.3"
  • Rear TyreFast Trak, Control casing, GRIPTON® compound, 60 TPI, 2Bliss Ready, 29x2.3"
  • SaddleBody Geometry S-Works Power, carbon fiber rails, carbon fiber base, 143mm
  • Seat PostS-Works FACT carbon, 10mm setback, 30.9mm
  • PriceR190,000.00
  • Weight (XL frame with sealant and SWAT Tools in Headset)10.2 kg

 

The Epic Range


Epic Pro
Epic Pro Pearl.jpg
  • FrameFACT 11m Full Carbon, Modern XC Race Geometry, Rider-First EngineeredTM, threaded BB, 12x148mm rear spacing, internal cable routing, 100mm of travel
  • SwatSWAT EMT Cage-Mount Tool
  • Rear ShockRockShox-Specialized BRAIN, Rx XC Tune, 5 Position Platform Adjust, Rebound Adjust, Integraded Extension, 265x52.5mm
  • ForkRockShox SID SL BRAIN, Top-Adjust Brain damper, Debon Air, 15x110mm, 44mm offset, 100mm Travel
  • StemSpecialized XC, 3D-forged alloy, 4-bolt, 6-degree rise
  • HandlebarsS-Works Carbon XC Mini Rise, 6-degree upsweep, 8-degree backsweep, 10mm rise, 760mm, 31.8mm
  • GripsSpecialized Trail Grips
  • Front BrakeSRAM Level TLM, 2-piston caliper, hydraulic disc
  • Rear BrakeSRAM Level TLM, 2-piston caliper, hydraulic disc
  • DerailleurSRAM X01 Eagle, 12-speed
  • Shift LeversSRAM AXS EAGLE Controller
  • Shift LeversSRAM XG-1295 Eagle, 12-speed, 10-50t
  • CassetteSRAM X01 Eagle, 12-speed
  • ChainSRAM X1 carbon Eagle, BoostTM 148, DUB, 32t, SM: 170mm, M-XL 175mm
  • CranksetSRAM Eagle Alloy, 32T, Direct mount
  • ChainringsSRAM DUB,BSA73mm,Threaded
  • Bottom BracketRoval Control Carbon, 25mm internal width, Zero bead hook, Tubeless ready, 28h
  • RimsDT Swiss 350, 15x110mm spacing, 6-bolt, 28h
  • Front HubDT Swiss 350, Star Ratchet, SRAM XD driver body, 12mm thru-axle, 148mm spacing, 28h
  • Rear HubDT Swiss Competition Race
  • SpokesFast Trak, Control casing, GRIPTON® compound, 60 TPI, 2Bliss Ready, 29x2.3"
  • Front TyreFast Trak, Control casing, GRIPTON® compound, 60 TPI, 2Bliss Ready, 29x2.3"
  • Rear TyreBody Geometry Power Expert
  • SaddleS-Works FACT carbon, 10mm setback, 30.9mm
  • Seat PostR140,000.00
Epic Expert
Epic Expert Red.jpg
  • FrameFACT 11m Full Carbon, Modern XC Race Geometry, Rider-First EngineeredTM, threaded BB, 12x148mm rear spacing, internal cable routing, 100mm of travel
  • SwatSWAT EMT Cage-Mount Tool
  • Rear ShockRockShox-Specialized BRAIN, Rx XC Tune, 5 Position Platform Adjust, Rebound Adjust, Integraded Extension, 265x52.5mm
  • ForkRockShox SID SL BRAIN, Bottom-Adjust Brain damper, Debon Air, 15x110mm, 44mm offset, 100mm Travel
  • StemSpecialized XC, 3D-forged alloy, 4-bolt, 6-degree rise
  • HandlebarsSpecialized Alloy Minirise, 10mm rise, 750mm, 31.8mm clamp
  • GripsSpecialized Trail Grips
  • Front BrakeSRAM Level TL, 2-piston caliper, hydraulic disc
  • Rear BrakeSRAM Level TL, 2-piston caliper, hydraulic disc
  • Rear DerailleurSRAM X01 Eagle,12-speed
  • Shift LeversSRAM X01 Eagle, trigger, 12-speed
  • CassetteSRAM XG-1275 Eagle, 12-speed, 10-50t
  • ChainSRAM GX Eagle, 12-speed
  • CranksetSRAM X1 Eagle, DUB, 32t, XS: 165mm, SM: 170mm, M-XL: 175mm
  • ChainringsSRAM Eagle Alloy 32T Direct mount
  • Bottom BracketSRAM DUB,BSA73mm,Threaded
  • RimsRoval Control Carbon, 25mm internal width, Zero bead hook, Tubeless ready, 28h
  • Front HubDT Swiss 350, 15x110mm spacing, Torque caps, 6-bolt, 28h
  • Rear HubDT Swiss 350, Star Ratchet, SRAM XD driver body, 12mm thru-axle, 148mm spacing, 28h
  • SpokesDT Swiss Competition Race
  • Front TyreFast Trak, Control casing, GRIPTON® compound, 60 TPI, 2Bliss Ready, 29x2.3"
  • Rear TyreFast Trak, Control casing, GRIPTON® compound, 60 TPI, 2Bliss Ready, 29x2.3"
  • SaddleBody Geometry Power Sport, hollow Cr-Mo rails
  • Seat PostSpecialized Alloy, Single Bolt, 30.9mm
  • PriceR110,000.00
Epic Comp
Epic Comp Orange.jpg
  • FrameFACT 11m Full Carbon, Modern XC Race Geometry, Rider-First EngineeredTM, threaded BB, 12x148mm rear spacing, internal cable routing, 100mm of travel
  • SwatSWAT EMT Cage-Mount Tool
  • Rear ShockRockShox-Specialized BRAIN, Rx XC Tune, 5 Position Platform Adjust, Rebound Adjust, Integraded Extension, 265x52.5mm
  • ForkRockShox Reba RL, Motion Control damper, Solo Air, 42mm offset, 15x110mm thru-axle, 100mm of travel
  • StemSpecialized XC, 3D-forged alloy, 4-bolt, 6-degree rise
  • HandlebarsSpecialized Alloy Minirise, 10mm rise, 750mm, 31.8mm clamp
  • GripsSpecialized Trail Grips
  • Front BrakeShimano SLX M7100, 2-piston caliper, hydraulic disc
  • Rear BrakeShimano SLX M7100, 2-piston caliper, hydraulic disc
  • Rear DerailleurShimano SLX M7100, SGS,12-speed
  • Shift LeversShimano SLX M7100, 12spd
  • CassetteShimano SLX CS-M7100, 12-speed, 10-51t
  • ChainShimano SLX M7100, 12-speed
  • CranksetShimano SLX 7100, Hollowtech 2, 32t Chainring, XS: 165mm, SM: 170mm, M-XL: 175mm
  • Chainrings32T
  • Bottom BracketShimano,BB52,Threaded
  • RimsSpecialized Alloy, Tubeless Ready, 25mm internal width, 28h
  • Front HubShimano MT400-B, Centerlock 28h, 15x110 Boost
  • Rear HubShimano MT510-B, Centerlock 28h, 12x148 Boost, Microspline
  • SpokesDT Swiss Industry
  • Front TyreFast Trak, Control casing, GRIPTON® compound, 60 TPI, 2Bliss Ready, 29x2.3"
  • Rear TyreFast Trak, Control casing, GRIPTON® compound, 60 TPI, 2Bliss Ready, 29x2.3"
  • SaddleBody Geometry Power Sport, hollow Cr-Mo rails
  • Seat PostSpecialized Alloy, Single Bolt, 30.9mm
  • PriceR78,000.00

 

Riding the S-Works Epic


The new Epic no longer has the AutoSag system for the shock set up. But don’t worry, it’s still fairly easy. Set the Brain fade to soft and measure 13mm sag, that’s roughly 27% wheel travel. I didn’t find that I needed to adjust the shock after the initial setup. The power meter paired with my Garmin computer on the first attempt. The shock took a bit longer but I finally settled going a good few PSI below the recommended pressure.

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-22.jpg
The Quarq power meter seamless becomes a part of your riding.

 

Technical trails are where the new Epic shines above the previous model. The new geometry angles feel perfect for the demands of modern cross-country mountain bikers. The bike rolls over rocks and bumps without fear of getting hung up or pitching over, even at the slowest speeds. With the lower bottom bracket and slacker head angle, you are positioned in the bike with a stable centre of gravity, allowing you to better put weight through the front wheel in the turns. It’s a stark contrast to the previous bike where I tiptoed my way through rock gardens always wary of making a mistake. The bike feels more like a trail bike bashing through and out the other side. Even with the rigid seat post, which I usually struggle with, the bike is manoeuvrable. But when you do put a dropper post on it becomes next level capable and playful. I say do it!

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-27.jpg

 

The Brain comes into its own on trails and Specialized acknowledge this themselves in saying that it is really for the XCO type rider where the Brain pays off the most. I only really jump on an Epic when a new bike launch comes around, so the Brain isn’t my regular riding experience. But when I do, I’m always surprised at how much thought goes into considering locking out. Every incline I’m usually trying to calculate whether I should smash through unlocked or firm it up a bit. While on trails where it’s usually full open to the bottom, now suddenly I have full support high up in the travel to shoot out of a corner hard on the pedals or to sprint through a short up section on an undulating trail. Playing with a fiddly lockout in some of these situations is just not possible. It is a liberating experience and allows you to get just on with the job of attacking the trail.

 

That said, the bike still reacts like a lightweight cross-country bike. The steering is super precise. You can place the front wheel exactly where you want it and turning is sharp without being twitchy. It’s a stable jumper with a light front end that is easily manhandled to correct your trajectory. While the Epic does pop off the ground well, it doesn’t have the same preload push that the Epic EVO does.

 

The sub-1300 gram Roval Control SL wheel also had their part to play in the feel of the new Epic. The lightweight and fast engagement accelerate you out of corners better than any other mountain bike wheel that I’ve ridden. The wider internal diameter adds volume and support to the FastTrak tyres giving you far more control in rough parts of the trail. Of course, with the ridiculous weight, they power up climbs like a dream too.

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021-29.jpg

 

The new Epic climbs as an Epic should. The bike is super stiff with a responsiveness that urges you to push even harder. Even with progressive trail bike inspired geometry, the Epic handles like a dream on the climbs. Thanks (in part) to the lower bottom bracket height, the Epic turns even the steepest corners without any suggestion of the front wheel lifting. It handles loose and wet surfaces well, keeping the rear wheel traction in check without the fear that your groin might inexplicably hurtle towards the headset cap.

 

The Brain is integral to this climbing experience. The wow moment for me is when moving from seated to standing to mash the pedals. Where many bikes start to waiver, there is no suggestion from the rear end that anything has changed. The bike actually feels even stiffer as your weight transfers forward. Although it does feel it, the rear end is not completely rigid. It is designed to have a few millimetres of give in the shock to absorb small bumps and provide some comfort when off-road. And I’ll gladly take it, the largest contrast between the Epic and Epic EVO is the smoothness and comfort. The Epic is a bit jittery in that department.

 

Specialized SWorks Epic 2021.jpg

 

The Brain does still make its characteristic knock. It is ever so slightly muted on the new bike but it does still feel like the axle might be working itself loose (don’t worry, it isn’t). I found it easy enough to get comfortable with and took it as a sign that the system was working in my favour. It is most notable when on blunt edge collisions with rocks or rooted sections going up climbs. On smoother terrain the Brain is far less likely to become active. Once at the top and bombing down, I could barely notice the Brain as it activates much faster at higher speeds. Overall, I appreciated the bike set to the firmest Brain fade. I found the middle setting to be too forgiving while knowing that the bike can be stiffer. The middle setting is far more comfortable and significantly reduces the feel of the Brain opening but still provides an adequate platform for efficient pedalling. A good setting for longer days/ stage races or when you’re just having fun on the trails.

 




215 Comments

DieselnDust, Jun 24 2020 10:26

To everyone moaning about the price. Your anger/irritation should be directed at the government and not at Specialized. They have single handedly resulted in the exorbitant pricing. In $ terms the price increase is not unreasonable. 

 

As for the comparison to motorbikes and cars it comes down to volumes. Way more cars and motorbikes are sold than SWorks Epics. 

 

 

 

Have you seen the comments on bike pricing on the the international bike forums?? None of it positive or considering pricing to be reasonable

Zula, Jun 24 2020 10:33

Have you seen the comments on bike pricing on the the international bike forums?? None of it positive or considering pricing to be unreasonable

 

Range topping models and products are expensive. Not sure why so many think that it should be affordable to the masses. Ok, maybe I do know why but I certainly don't want to open that can of worms here. 

 

Fact is that the ZAR is more of a factor in the pricing, for SA at least, than the increase in USD. Compliments of the Absolutely No Consequence crew. 

Bos, Jun 24 2020 10:37

We're all different. I love riding short travel bikes on all levels of trail. It makes every trail on your ride fun no matter the grade. Our trails aren't overly technical or steep and I find riding a big travel bike limits my enjoyment on easier trails. I also like the pedalling as I tend to link a number of trail networks into a single ride all while leaving from home. That said, I'm definitely more in the Epic Evo camp than the race-focussed Epic but give it a dropper post and the bike still rips.

Hey, of course man, Im not bashing anyone, I was just saying. Probably stating the obvious. Trails are obviously not this bikes main focus, and I agree with you, but a capable rider can do amazing things with these things. I use to be an advocate for this, even doing the Plumber, drop included with my full height saddle although pretty darn scary!

 

I think I'm just getting old :) 

Markellis, Jun 24 2020 10:42

These comparisons always come up with bicycles and motorbikes.

It would be interesting to know where the most money and time is spent on R&D between the two industries.

I would think the cost of competitive gain in the cycling industry is way more than the motorcycle industry because the margins of gain are so much smaller, a few hundred grams on a bicycle makes a bigger difference than on a motorbike for example.

Nick, Jun 24 2020 10:42

even doing the Plumber, drop included with my full height saddle

That's crazy talk! I'm a terrible high poster.

Grease_Monkey, Jun 24 2020 10:55

Does this bike come with a 170 crank? Ride it anywhere meaningful and surely you're going to be whacking things?

 

Most bikes come with 175mm cranks. It's only recently that bikes have started being specced with 170mm - and mostly on trail and enduro bikes. This is a great move from Spez. I like shorter cranks - but that may be because I have stumpy legs. Very few bikes come with 165mm cranks - mostly DH bikes actually.

Cookie88, Jun 24 2020 11:00

It would be interesting to hear how many S-Works Epic's Spez South Africa sells in a year... For us middle Class folk, who can only ogle and puzzle at that price point, I think the number would be quite surprising...  

Underachiever, Jun 24 2020 11:37

It would be interesting to hear how many S-Works Epic's Spez South Africa sells in a year... For us middle Class folk, who can only ogle and puzzle at that price point, I think the number would be quite surprising...  

+ how many of those end up in the bottom half of the race results.

Myth, Jun 24 2020 11:49

Well...if no one is going to say this...very very nice, if not stellar, photos from Mr Sadie.  

avalanx, Jun 24 2020 11:56

Nice bike, Nice paint options. It feels like a bit of a forgotten art with all the attention going to Geo, Kinematics, tech etc. Nice one Spez. I'd love one of those Magic mushroom inspired paint-jobs. via Pinkbike

 

Funny I didn't see one in Jonkershoek this passed weekend ;)

Speaking of Stellies though, I know the big "S" is based in Stellies, so It makes sense to have this shoot/launch there. I rode Armageddon which is more on the xc side of things, right? Well I rode it (on my Enduro bike) with my brother inlaw on his RM Element, and I suddenly became aware how rough and technical even that trail was. Hard to Imagine anyone still wanting 100mm bikes. But then again, 90% of the country rides dirtroads I guess.. If you live and ride in these areas however, and taking into account how efficient bikes are these days,  a 120mm Epic would be my choice. 

 

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I totally agree with you I think more than 90% of Epic owners will use it as a glorified gravel bike. Sort of sad to think about really.

 

That being said, I the the big S really nailed the geometry on this bike, definitely the most progressive mainstream XC bike around!

Zula, Jun 24 2020 12:35

+ how many of those end up in the bottom half of the race results.

 

Why is that important? 

 

If you have the cash and want the bike, go for it. Where you place in the results is irrelevant. 

Markellis, Jun 24 2020 12:42

Why is that important?

If you have the cash and want the bike, go for it. Where you place in the results is irrelevant.


100% Agree

If you drive a M3 it doesn’t mean you a full time racer so why can’t people ride nice bikes if that’s their passion.

SwissVan, Jun 24 2020 12:52

Still Bloody SRAM group sets
Baaaah

DieselnDust, Jun 24 2020 01:24

100% Agree

If you drive a M3 it doesn’t mean you a full time racer so why can’t people ride nice bikes if that’s their passion.

 

 

 

Silly comparison really since many who drive an M3 can't and end up killing people, especially when they switch the TC off.

most Spec riders don't kill other riders or pedestrians. They just look silly coming last in the race with a group of guys on 1million ZAR +worth of bikes

Underachiever, Jun 24 2020 01:38

100% Agree

If you drive a M3 it doesn’t mean you a full time racer so why can’t people ride nice bikes if that’s their passion.

Sorry that I hit a nerve?

 

I do agree abt people and passion and money.

 

I would love to have a Patek or Audemars or Lange&Sohne watch, although they tells the same time as my Tissot.

 

I am seriously envious of my neighbour when he takes the yellow 488 for a spin.

 

Perhaps it's about balance.

 

It looks seriously odd, if a non so serious MAMIL rocks up in the washing bay with his R200k bike, just before the sun sets.  

DieselnDust, Jun 24 2020 01:47

Sorry that I hit a nerve?

 

I do agree abt people and passion and money.

 

I would love to have a Patek or Audemars or Lange&Sohne watch, although they tells the same time as my Tissot.

 

I am seriously envious of my neighbour when he takes the yellow 488 for a spin.

 

Perhaps it's about balance.

 

It looks seriously odd, if a non so serious MAMIL rocks up in the washing bay with his R200k bike, just before the sun sets.  

 

 

Some people just have to have what is perceive "the best". They would feel less important if they rode equipment that reflects their ability. Ego is a powerful incentive for bike manufacturers to mark up high end bikes 50%.

 

Also Specialized has a big team they have to support. That marketing budget has to be recovered from the suckers who feel that if they just had an extra 4 hrs a day to train that they can also beat Christoph and CoolHarvey.

Markellis, Jun 24 2020 01:56

It looks seriously odd, if a non so serious MAMIL rocks up in the washing bay with his R200k bike, just before the sun sets.


Hahaha I see what saying

I can’t afford to ride a 200K bike but would love to have a yellow S-works in the lounge, I love bikes and don’t care what people think.

And no I don’t have an ego issue either :)

Jewbacca, Jun 24 2020 02:19

It's the same argument as having a 500k car when surely a 100k car is good enough to drive around town?

 

Anyway, the bike industry is it's own economy. Trying to make sense of pricing is, like I said, trying to understand the football economy or why Hollywood actors get paid millions to read lines.

 

We demand entertainment, there is a market, that market economy inflates its value etc.... The cycle is endless if the demand exists.

 

Anyway, I don't have 200k to spend on a bike. I just wanted to discuss how awesome the bike is.

 

Apparently we can't do that. Oh well.

Underachiever, Jun 24 2020 02:34

It's the same argument as having a 500k car when surely a 100k car is good enough to drive around town?

 

Anyway, the bike industry is it's own economy. Trying to make sense of pricing is, like I said, trying to understand the football economy or why Hollywood actors get paid millions to read lines.

 

We demand entertainment, there is a market, that market economy inflates its value etc.... The cycle is endless if the demand exists.

 

Anyway, I don't have 200k to spend on a bike. I just wanted to discuss how awesome the bike is.

 

Apparently we can't do that. Oh well.

I wish they will also have such rad paint jobs on cheapies.  Why are the bikes that we can afford always the ugly duckling?

DieselnDust, Jun 24 2020 03:27

I wish they will also have such rad paint jobs on cheapies.  Why are the bikes that we can afford always the ugly duckling?

 

 

They have to create the illusion that you're not worth the million bucks for the zooty paint jobs. Keeping you aspirational keeps their prices higher. Imagine they marketed the SLX bike as a race winner!!

The outcry

stringbean, Jun 24 2020 03:59

It would be interesting to hear how many S-Works Epic's Spez South Africa sells in a year... For us middle Class folk, who can only ogle and puzzle at that price point, I think the number would be quite surprising...  

although looking at the prices my stomach churns but I tell you they will sell them all.

Chatting to the wahoo guys today,they brought in 50 kikr bikes and sold all of them in a few days so there are people out there with cash

Cookie88, Jun 24 2020 04:52

although looking at the prices my stomach churns but I tell you they will sell them all.

Chatting to the wahoo guys today,they brought in 50 kikr bikes and sold all of them in a few days so there are people out there with cash

 

Exactly my point Stringbean - South African's have an obsession with having the top of the pops stuff... Only difference is my 'top of the pops' is indulging in an XX1 Chain on my GX Groupset... Althought depending on who you ask I could be saving myself some money on chain wear & tear  :P

Cookie88, Jun 24 2020 04:54

+ how many of those end up in the bottom half of the race results.

 

Touche' Sir  :thumbup:

peetwindhoek, Jun 24 2020 05:22

The SLX version is “only” R78k. So not really R190k. What would the frameset options be? See the previous now “old” frameset sells for R40k.

ScaredShiftless, Jun 24 2020 05:27

It would be interesting to hear how many S-Works Epic's Spez South Africa sells in a year... For us middle Class folk, who can only ogle and puzzle at that price point, I think the number would be quite surprising...  

I would love to know this too. Especially, say, compared to how many F 750 GS motorbikes BMW sell a year at the same price...