Review: Giant Reign Advanced 27.5 1

When the new 650b Giant Reign was announced, its "out there" geometry had me intrigued. Giant certainly didn't hold back and I was very eager to see how this bike performed out on the trails.

The Frame


The new Reign and Reign Advanced fully embrace longer, lower and slacker geometry. Doing some research, I discovered that the Reign's 65° head angle and 1,217mm wheelbase is an exact match to the Intense Uzzi - a park bike with 180mm of rear wheel travel! For even more perspective consider this: the 2015 Reign as tested here is slacker and has a longer wheelbase than a 2013 Giant Glory downhill bike.

 

Giant Reign Advanced 12.jpg

 

Fortunately, short chainstays (434mm) help to keep the length of the wheelbase in check and assist with fast handling and flickability through tight trails. The short chainstay length was in part achieved by using a single-spar rear swingarm, while the Trance 27.5 uses the split-spar design. With this “tighter” design, Giant managed to shave off over 5 millimetres without sacrificing tyre size clearance.

 

Giant Reign Advanced 17.jpg

 

To overcome some of the negative effects a super slack head angle can have on pedaling and climbing, Giant worked with RockShox to develop a custom Pike. They built three different Pikes with varying offsets and tested them with Adam Craig (Giant team rider). Following feedback from him and the rest of the Off-Road Factory Team, they settled on a Pike with a 46mm offset, an increase of 4mm over the "standard" Pike. In short, the greater offset reduces trail which helps offset the increase in trail resulting from the slacker head angle.

 

The carbon front triangle on the Reign Advanced has allowed Giant to drop the frame weight to a claimed 2260 grams (without shock), making it the lightest Reign they have ever produced, and lighter than some XC and trail frames. An alloy rear triangle is still used as it adds very little weight, improves durability and helps keep the price down.

 

The Reign makes use of Giant's Maestro dual link suspension layout, which uses a rocker link mounted on the seat tube and another link that curves over the bottom bracket to join the rear swing arm to the front triangle.

 

Giant Reign Advanced 13.jpg

 

The frame features an integrated downtube protector, fits a full size bottle in the front triangle and internal cable routing (with a single port on each side of the head tube) keeps lines and routing clean.

 

Components


Component highlights are numerous. The Advanced 1 comes dripping in kit from Rockshox, with a Monarch Plus DebonAir and Pike RC Dual Position (130mm-160mm) doing suspension duties. All models in the Reign line-up except the Reign 2 (the base aluminium model) come standard with a RockShox Reverb Stealth dropper.

 

Fork:
The fact that Giant equip a Pike right through the range shows that they are serious about the Reign's intended purpose. No corner-cutting here. The Dual Position (130-160mm) Pike RC on the Advanced 1 adds to the bike's versatility. It's unfortunately not possible to tweak the fork's progression with RockShox's bottomless tokens but I felt that this fork seemed to need it less (for my liking anyway) than fixed travel models. The advantage of having a dual position is that it lowers the front end making the bike more manageable as an all-day bike.

 


Giant Reign Advanced 2.jpg

Giant Reign Advanced 16.jpg


Shock:
The rear features Giant's Maestro Suspension and RockShox's Monarch Plus DebonAir RC3. To match the supple movement of the shared lower linkage and bottom shock mount axle, Giant uses a cartridge bearing at the top of the shock rather than a standard solid-state bushing. This, paired with the shock's tune, results in a super plush initial stroke with great control and consistency through the mid stroke.

 

As a testimony to the level of attention to detail that went into the new Reign's design, the shock sits off-centre to the non-dive side, creating more space for the drivetrain and the lower linkage and the top shock mount pivots.

 

Handlebar & Stem:
A 31.8mm diameter Giant Contact SL DH handlebar comes in a super wide 800mm. Great to see the forward-thinking employed here - if it's too wide cut it down to your liking, no need to buy an aftermarket bar. The stubby stem complements the wide bars and again saves money on aftermarket purchases.

 

Giant Reign Advanced 4.jpg

 

Drivetrain:
The 2x10 drivetrain and brakes are Shimano's highly rated SLX groupset with a XT Shadow+ rear derailleur. Shifting was solid and functional. The bike ships with a chain retention device, but on a big hit bike like this, I prefer a 1x drivetrain with some sort of Narrow / Wide chainring to keep the chain in check.

 


Giant Reign Advanced 7.jpg

Giant Reign Advanced 6.jpg


So the drivetrain was upgraded to a Praxis 10-speed Wide Range Cassette (11-40) and a 30T Praxis Narrow / Wide Chainring. It's a relatively inexpensive upgrade and adds to the bike's all-mountain nature.

 

Seatpost:
A bike like this wouldn't make sense without a dropper post and thankfully it comes standard with a RockShox Reverb Stealth. We've had one of these on a number of bikes and it always gets the job done.

 

Wheelset:
The P-AM2 rims are laced to a Giant Tracker hub in front and a DT Swiss 350 in the rear. These would be my next upgrade on this bike. The new breed of wide rims have spoiled me for sheer grip and traction, and I'm sure the Reign (read me) will benefit as well.

 

Giant Reign Advanced 10.jpg

 

Tyres:
Often a new bike is let down by it's factory fitted tyres - not here though. The Reign Advanced 1 comes standard with a 2.35 Schwalbe Magic Mary (Trailstar, Snakeskin, Double Defense) in front and a 2.35 Schwalbe Hans Dampf (Pacestar, Snakeskin, Double Defense) at the back. They offer great levels of grip and the double defense, Snakeskin sidewalls provide good security.

 


Giant Reign Advanced 14.jpg

Giant Reign Advanced 8.jpg


Full specifications:


[spec_list][spec_list_row=Sizes]S,M,L,XL[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Colours]Green[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Frame]Advanced-Grade Carbon / ALUXX SL Rear, 6.3"/160mm Maestro Suspension[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Fork]RockShox Pike RC Dual Position Air, 130-160mm travel, 15mm Thru-Axle, Giant Custom 46mm Offset[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Shock]RockShox Monarch Plus DebonAir RT[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Handlebar]Giant Contact SL DH, 800x31.8mm[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Stem]Truvativ Holzfeller (40-60mm)[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Seatpost]RockShox Reverb Stealth, 30.9mm, 125mm (M-XL) 100mm (S)[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Saddle]Giant Contact, Upright[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Shifters]Shimano SLX[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Front derailleur"]Shimano SLX[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Rear derailleur"]Shimano XT, Shadow+[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Brakes]Shimano SLX [F] 200mm [R] 180mm[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Brake levers"]Shimano SLX[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Cassette]Shimano HG50 11-36, 10-speed[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Chain]KMC X-10[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Crankset]Shimano SLX, 24/38 w/ MRP 2x Guide with bash guard (AL backplate)[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Bottom bracket"]Shimano Press Fit[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Rims]Giant P-AM2[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Hubs][F] Giant Tracker w/ 15mm Axle, / [R] DT Swiss 350 142x12mm, 32h w/ SRAM Maxle TA[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Spokes]Sapim Race, double-butted, black[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Tyres]Custom [F] Schwalbe Magic Mary 27.5x2.35" Snakeskin Trail Star w/ Race Guard [R] Schwalbe Hans Dampf 27.5x2.35" Snakeskin Pace Star w/ Race Guard[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Weight]13.9kg all in[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="2015 RRP"]R 49,995 (only Small & Med left in stock)[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="2016 RRP"]R 67,500[/spec_list_row][/spec_list]

 

On the Trail


When heading out for the first ride you need to forget what you know about 160mm bikes and about bikes with a 65° head angle. The bike's side profile doesn't help either, as its stance is long, slack and menacing. It looks like the neighbourhood dog that is up to no good; ready to tackle whatever you have to throw at it with an evil growl.

 

Let's start with how the Reign climbs. Too good - as easy as that. Surely a bike with these numbers shouldn't be able to climb it's way to the top. Yes, unless you previous bike was a Morewood Mbuzi, you are not about to KOM the climbs, but chances are you will have plenty of personal bests. The Monarch Plus climbs best with a flick of the lever to add some platform. Fortunately it doesn't try to change the bike into a XC slaying hardtail. It adds only enough to help without feeling that it interferes or alters the bike's character.

 

When the trail gets steep, it helps to drop the fork to its 130mm setting. Although it's not essential and I always feel it's better to counter the head angle with technique. With the fork fully extended, it wasn't as difficult as expected to keep the wheel down and pointing in the right direction. It's not as effortless as a Trance or Anthem, obviously not, but not nearly as much effort as one would expect thanks in part to the custom off set Pike.

 

On flat or rolling sections you may as well be on a Trance SX with only the grip and weight of the tyres giving away that you're on a bigger bike. The long top tube provides some much needed breathing space on a bike that's intended to be your one bike.

 

Giant Reign Advanced 1.jpg

 

Climb the bike to the trail head and that evil growl returns. It will happily carve trails all day long and proof that this is no ordinary "mini DH" bike. That being said, it is a lot of bike if you're planning on riding mostly flowy, smooth single track. You will need a fair bit of gravity and rough terrain to get the most out of the Reign.

 

Tackling rough terrain is a joy and allows the bike and the sum of its parts to shine. Shine bright like a diamond. I can't recall ever riding any bike that felt as capable when the going gets rough. Grip, traction, composure and vigour are all non-issues allowing you to focus on hanging on and picking your next line. Hammer it ride in and ride out and you will get the most out of this bike.

 

The Pike / Monarch combo come to life when ridden hard, offering class-leading control. One tweak I can suggest is to play with the spacers in the shock to aid progression and mid-range travel - especially if you're an aggressive or heavy rider. Getting the bike to feel balanced was a simple task, helped by the "neutral" feel on the bike. Even though the Reign was the first of the new breed of Enduro bikes that I have tried, it felt familiar from the off.

 

Verdict


The Reign's neutral feel and confidence inspiring handling will help bridge the gap for riders looking to push into the next frontier. This is by no means an average bike for the occasional rider. Yes, it will smooth obstacles in your path, but if you're not planning to hammer your bike down treacherous terrain until your lounges and legs burn, then chances are you will not get close to this bike's limit.

 

The almighty RockShox fork and shock, the bike's suspension design, wide bars & stubby stem, dropper post and clever geometry tweaks all playing their part to create a beast of a bike. Think of the Giant Reign Advanced as an engineering feat.

 

Pros

  • Depending on what you're after, this is a very capable all-round bike and could be your one, true one-bike
  • Top end suspension
  • Arrives kitted out as a bike like this should. Upgrades will be purely personal preference
  • Represents excellent value for money
Cons
  • Makes you question your riding!
  • J.R.A. (Just Riding Along) is no longer good enough




104 Comments

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Dec 01 2015 08:12

Sorry, but no.  The ZAR only has so much to do with it.  Other brands have reflected ZAR-linked inflation and have a 15% year on year increase to show for it.  The bike itself is more expensive in USD base.

 

Furthermore, it'll be a cold day in hell that I concede that R70k is "good value for money" for a bicycle.  Relative to other overpriced, overmarketed, overhyped bikes?  Sure, a bargain.  In actual terms compared to, oh I don't know, a motorvehicle?  Don't make me laugh.

 

The bike industry is too busy backslapping itself to realise it's becoming a joke.  Seriously, Lacondeguy's sentiments on enduro find application.

 


Nico, the USD price increase was just 7.36% (4850 to 5200) Remove that from the equation and the increase attributable to the USD/ZAR exchange remains 27.5%. And here's the thing - IT COULD BE WORSE. If Giant SA hadn't bought this lot at that old rate, the increase would have been 50% (taking current exchange rates into account) If the exchange rate hadn't changed, RRP would be just be 7.36% more. Stop complaining about stuff which you clearly do not take the time to understand.

NicoBoshoff, Dec 01 2015 08:27

Nico, the USD price increase was just 7.36% (4850 to 5200) Remove that from the equation and the increase attributable to the USD/ZAR exchange remains 27.5%. And here's the thing - IT COULD BE WORSE. If Giant SA hadn't bought this lot at that old rate, the increase would have been 50% (taking current exchange rates into account) If the exchange rate hadn't changed, RRP would be just be 7.36% more. Stop complaining about stuff which you clearly do not take the time to understand.

So how is it that other brands managed to restrict their increases for 2016 to 15%?

 

The ZAR rate was at a low of R10.18 during the last two years and a year ago it was around R11.50, which on a year on year comparison is about a 25% deterioration, but of course they didn't pl ace the order today and given the gradual slide of the ZAR the last few months the difference would be less than the current December - December extremes (but probably around the 20 - 25% range). 

 

So I am still not seeing the 27.5% or the 50% you hint at?

 

But ok, since we're chucking insults around, I'll make you a deal.  I'll stop complaining about things I don't understand if you stop posting advice about things you don't understand.

Odinson, Dec 01 2015 08:43

Why did Giant even bother with the Dual Position Pike, when it's widely regarded as the unloved stepchild of the Pike family?

 

Anyhow, a 2X10 SLX drivetrain R67k bike makes me nauseous. 

 

Good review, Iwan. 

Duane_Bosch, Dec 01 2015 08:45

Sorry, but no.  The ZAR only has so much to do with it.  Other brands have reflected ZAR-linked inflation and have a 15% year on year increase to show for it.  The bike itself is more expensive in USD base.

 

Furthermore, it'll be a cold day in hell that I concede that R70k is "good value for money" for a bicycle.  Relative to other overpriced, overmarketed, overhyped bikes?  Sure, a bargain.  In actual terms compared to, oh I don't know, a motorvehicle?  Don't make me laugh.

 

The bike industry is too busy backslapping itself to realise it's becoming a joke.  Seriously, Lacondeguy's sentiments on enduro find application.

 

 

                              ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

 

What this guy said.

 

You can get a 2016 Kawasaki KX450F for 91k. The 250F comes in at 85. And believe me that thing will still have you soiling your underwear.

 

It comes out the factory with Renthal bars, Nissin brakes and a KYB air forks.

 

The cycling industry is a joke and we are all to blame.

Iwan Kemp, Dec 01 2015 08:48

Why did Giant even bother with the Dual Position Pike, when it's widely regarded as the unloved stepchild of the Pike family?

 

Anyhow, a 2X10 SLX drivetrain R67k bike makes me nauseous. 

 

Good review, Iwan. 

 

:thumbup:  Thanks. Dual Position is much improved over the Two-Step that went before it. Performance deficit to the fixed travel version is less than Talas to Float, even though that gap has also been narrowed.

 

I guess it's to help with the climbing bit. I'm not too fussed about that and would prefer a fixed travel fork, but the dual position gives little away. Some prefer its feel over a tokenless Pike.

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Dec 01 2015 08:53

So how is it that other brands managed to restrict their increases for 2016 to 15%?

 

Different purchase times, I'm assuming. Quite simply. When you have to pay at a certain time, you either have some set aside for future purchase (if your bank or provider allows you the option of doing that, though it creates havoc with some accounting systems paying for stock and receiving nothing in return until some and such date) or you pay according to the rate at that time. Rate went up from 10 to 12 VERY quickly, and then up to the current 14.5 even faster. 

 

 

So I am still not seeing the 27.5% or the 50% you hint at?

 

$4,850 = R 49,995 = 10.31:1

$5,200 @ 10.31:1 = R 53,603 (rounding up)

$ 5,200 = R 67,500 = 12.98:1

$ 5,200 @ 14.5: 1 = R 75,400 

 

Taking figures above - if ZAR / USD hadn't changed AT ALL - increase would have been R3,604 or 7.2%.

 

But it did.

 

The exchange rate changed by 25.9% between RA1 2015 & RA1 2016. The 27.5% I alluded to was because I was working off your claimed increase of 35% and reducing that by the 7.216% USD cost increase. 

 

IF we were working off today's rate @ 14.5:1, we'd have a ZAR price of R 75,200. For a fully XT equipped carbon bike. a 50% increase in cost, almost SOLELY attributable to a rise in exchange rate.

 

 

 

But ok, since we're chucking insults around, I'll make you a deal.  I'll stop complaining

about things I don't understand if you stop posting advice about things you don't understand.

 

How about you tell the likes of Chris Porter, Giant, Mondraker, etc yourself, instead of attacking me. That's just some of the contributors to the material I've read, in order to form my opinion. Not to mention my own experiences, which, whilst at warp snail, are still valid. Seems you're just having a problem accepting that you may be wrong.

Iwan Kemp, Dec 01 2015 08:53

                              ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

 

What this guy said.

 

You can get a 2016 Kawasaki KX450F for 91k. The 250F comes in at 85. And believe me that thing will still have you soiling your underwear.

 

It comes out the factory with Renthal bars, Nissin brakes and a KYB air forks.

 

The cycling industry is a joke and we are all to blame.

 

Yes. We get the motorbike analogy. I think the problem is with the consumer-driven insistence to either revamp or touch up every bike in their range every year. Most motorbikes sport carry over parts from year to year and only ever so often go the full monty when it comes to updating. Engines, frames, gearboxes, electronics, etc  are shared across platforms, although in different tunes (250F, 250R, 250X).

 

Some say a KX450F is ridiculous money when you can buy a car for the same money. Looks like the motorbike industry is a joke as well. We're all part of the Truman show.

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Dec 01 2015 08:55

Why did Giant even bother with the Dual Position Pike, when it's widely regarded as the unloved stepchild of the Pike family?

 

Anyhow, a 2X10 SLX drivetrain R67k bike makes me nauseous. 

 

Good review, Iwan. 

That was the 2015 version. 2016 has full XT m8000

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Dec 01 2015 08:56

Yes. We get the motorbike analogy. I think the problem is with the consumer-driven insistence to either revamp or touch up every bike in their range every year. Most motorbikes sport carry over parts from year to year and only ever so often go the full monty when it comes to updating. Engines, frames, gearboxes, electronics, etc  are shared across platforms, although in different tunes (250F, 250R, 250X).

 

Some say a KX450F is ridiculous money when you can buy a car for the same money. Looks like the motorbike industry is a joke as well. We're all part of the Truman show.

This, most likely. 

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Dec 01 2015 08:57

Yes. We get the motorbike analogy. I think the problem is with the consumer-driven insistence to either revamp or touch up every bike in their range every year. Most motorbikes sport carry over parts from year to year and only ever so often go the full monty when it comes to updating. Engines, frames, gearboxes, electronics, etc  are shared across platforms, although in different tunes (250F, 250R, 250X).

 

Some say a KX450F is ridiculous money when you can buy a car for the same money. Looks like the motorbike industry is a joke as well. We're all part of the Truman show.

Given the choice, I'd far rather have the KX though. Or the equivalent roadgoing version. 

Iwan Kemp, Dec 01 2015 08:57

1.

Maybe also worth mentioning that not all importers pay for their bikes at the same time and in the same way. Some secure price in advance, others pay before it ships and some pay whenever based on the exchange rate when it clears customs.

 

We are comparing one year with another without knowing those details. 

 

2.

R/$ is one thing. Cost of material is another.

 

************
I'm not trying to defend a price increase - just adding some more info to the discussion.

Odinson, Dec 01 2015 08:58

That was the 2015 version. 2016 has full XT m8000

 

That's much better. I can dig it with that spec.

Duane_Bosch, Dec 01 2015 09:01

Yes. We get the motorbike analogy. I think the problem is with the consumer-driven insistence to either revamp or touch up every bike in their range every year. Most motorbikes sport carry over parts from year to year and only ever so often go the full monty when it comes to updating. Engines, frames, gearboxes, electronics, etc  are shared across platforms, although in different tunes (250F, 250R, 250X).

 

Some say a KX450F is ridiculous money when you can buy a car for the same money. Looks like the motorbike industry is a joke as well. We're all part of the Truman show.

 

Bicycles also sport OEM components that are carried across multiple models and brands so your component counter argument doesn't hold water IMO.

 

And the KX45F vs bicycle comparison is valid in my opinion because they are both toys whereas a car generally is not.

 

The fact remains. Bicycles are MASSIVELY overpriced when compared to other consumer products. The only things I can think of that are more ridiculous are jewelry and high end watches.

 

So please no one try and argue that a Breitling watch is worth 100k.

 

Still love you Iwan.

Iwan Kemp, Dec 01 2015 09:05

A story that went largely unnoticed was Felt who announced earlier this year that they will be doing away with model years completely and follow the Santa Cruz / Ibis (as an example) model and only introduce upgrades if and when ready. Rather have rolling updates and spec changes than having to re-tool and have new molds made every year.

Iwan Kemp, Dec 01 2015 09:10

Bicycles also sport OEM components that are carried across multiple models and brands so your component counter argument doesn't hold water IMO.

 

And the KX45F vs bicycle comparison is valid in my opinion because they are both toys whereas a car generally is not.

 

The fact remains. Bicycles are MASSIVELY overpriced when compared to other consumer products. The only things I can think of that are more ridiculous are jewelry and high end watches.

 

So please no one try and argue that a Breitling watch is worth 100k.

 

Still love you Iwan.

 

Not a counter argument - I actually agree with you! Was just highlighting those facts, that, like you say, is the same in the bicycle trade. 

Duane_Bosch, Dec 01 2015 09:11

Further to my argument I'm going to make a few sweeping statements. And I'm going to continue with my Motorcycle vs Buycycle comparison. And yes I concede we are our own worst enemies here.

 

1. There are too many bike brands. The numbers are too small, making economic production impossible.

2. The industry is upside down. With motorcycles the big 4 own the component guys. Yamaha own Ohlins. Honda owns KYB and Showa. Kawasaki owns Nissin brakes whereas in cycling the frame makers suck hind tit.

3. We believe the bull**** hype

4. There's too much choice. How many versions of the reign are there? 4? Why? 

Iwan Kemp, Dec 01 2015 09:12

Still love you Iwan.

 

:wub:

 

(Almost missed that)

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Dec 01 2015 09:45

Not a counter argument - I actually agree with you! Was just highlighting those facts, that, like you say, is the same in the bicycle trade. 

Same. Immensely overpriced, but it is what we, and the producers, have made it out to be. 

 

Bicycles have ALWAYS been expensive, though. Even in the 90's, the top bikes were in the high thousand dollar range. 

 

But yeah. They're bloody expensive compared to other toys and vehicles. Never said they weren't. However, in this particular case, Nico's ignorance of the effect of ZAR / USD movements and the effects they have on the price needed to be attended to.

 

"35% WTF LOL they're smoking" needed to be put into context. 

raptor-22, Dec 01 2015 10:01

Bicycles also sport OEM components that are carried across multiple models and brands so your component counter argument doesn't hold water IMO.
 
And the KX45F vs bicycle comparison is valid in my opinion because they are both toys whereas a car generally is not.
 
The fact remains. Bicycles are MASSIVELY overpriced when compared to other consumer products. The only things I can think of that are more ridiculous are jewelry and high end watches.
 
So please no one try and argue that a Breitling watch is worth 100k.
 
Still love you Iwan.




You are 100% correct. My insurer just asked me for revaluations on wife's jewellery and my bikes. I asked why those specifically and the response was those items are generally overvalued from purchase and insured value, then get lost easily and naturally the most claimed against. But the overvalued statement had me intrigued

raptor-22, Dec 01 2015 10:07

Toys are ego purchases.

Ego will always pay more for no reason

NicoBoshoff, Dec 01 2015 10:07

Same. Immensely overpriced, but it is what we, and the producers, have made it out to be. 

 

Bicycles have ALWAYS been expensive, though. Even in the 90's, the top bikes were in the high thousand dollar range. 

 

But yeah. They're bloody expensive compared to other toys and vehicles. Never said they weren't. However, in this particular case, Nico's ignorance of the effect of ZAR / USD movements and the effects they have on the price needed to be attended to.

 

"35% WTF LOL they're smoking" needed to be put into context. 

No.  You're redirecting the argument as you see fit.

 

My argument was "How the hell is this 35% more expensive when other large brands are managing 15% (and in some cases 8-10%)?"
 

People then chimed in with the exchange rate trope.

 

My reply was that the exchange rate, which affects all equally, cannot account for this increase when others somehow avoided it.  Yes, the exchange rate makes sense as part reason for this actual bike's increase, but why is Giant so particularly sensitive to it?

 

The exchange rate jump is around 20% - 25% for the last year so purchasing times is bull.

 

So my point (albeit poorly expressed) and conclusion is that Giant's business model is less consumer friendly when other brands have managed to absorb some of the exhange rate knock on.

NicoBoshoff, Dec 01 2015 10:13

 

 

But your 35% is actually 31%, hence the error.

 

 

 

R67 500 - R49 995 = R17 505 / R49 995 = .35 x 100 = 35%

 

Or am I again doing something wrong?

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Dec 01 2015 10:15

R67 500 - R49 995 = R17 505 / R49 995 = .35 x 100 = 35%

 

Or am I again doing something wrong?

No, I'm doing something wrong. I used 15,500 instead of 17,500. My apologies (goes off to edit post)

droenn, Dec 01 2015 10:31

My reply was that the exchange rate, which affects all equally, cannot account for this increase when others somehow avoided it.  Yes, the exchange rate makes sense as part reason for this actual bike's increase, but why is Giant so particularly sensitive to it?

 

The exchange rate jump is around 20% - 25% for the last year so purchasing times is bull.

 

So my point (albeit poorly expressed) and conclusion is that Giant's business model is less consumer friendly when other brands have managed to absorb some of the exhange rate knock on.

 

Interesting comment, I would have thought Giant (along with Specialized) less sensitive.

 

Quote from a review of Trance for Aus market:

 

 

Giant are well known for offering great bang for your buck, often cited as the benchmark in competitive pricing in Australia. In recent times where the of state Australian dollar has seen the prices of bikes steadily creep up, it’s the big guys like Giant Australia who have the power to keep their bikes affordable, and it shows with this bike.

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Dec 01 2015 10:39

 

My reply was that the exchange rate, which affects all equally, cannot account for this increase when others somehow avoided it.  Yes, the exchange rate makes sense as part reason for this actual bike's increase, but why is Giant so particularly sensitive to it?

 

The exchange rate jump is around 20% - 25% for the last year so purchasing times is bull.

 

So my point (albeit poorly expressed) and conclusion is that Giant's business model is less consumer friendly when other brands have managed to absorb some of the exhange rate knock on.

See, the thing is, Nico, it doesn't. It's highly dependent on WHEN the purchase or transfer is made. To prove this, here is a snapshot of the 2y chart for the ZAR/USD As you can see, it makes rapid gains and losses on an almost permanent basis. 

 

ZARUSD.jpg

 

Digging down to the 1 year chart, you can see it even more closely. This is particularly applicable as the bunch that had an RRP of R 49,995 was brought in at the end of 2014. Now, this bunch was brought in about 2 or 3 months ago. See the difference there?

 

Now - have a look at the 1 year chart. Can you see the volatility there? In the place of just a month, you've got a differential of up to 12% in currency fluctuations alone, between August and September. 

 

ZARUSD1yr.jpg

 

Now, I don't know when Specialized / Trek / Giant bought their currency, but if you actually dig down into it, this volatility explains it all for you, and shows how on some were less affected by the currency creepage than others were.