Review: Onza Canis 29 x 2.25 Tyres

Though a little before my mountain biking time, Onza (or OnZa) was one of the big brands in mountain bike tyres and other components in the late nineties. While the brand faded away in the early 2000’s more recently a swiss-based company relaunched the Onza brand and range of tyres.

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Meet the Onza Canis which I’ve been testing out over a good few rides. The Canis is somewhat of a crossover tyre, classed by Onza as “Cross country / All mountain” it is said to give a combination of low rolling resistance and good grip.

 


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Specifications


I tested the Onza Canis 29 x 2.25 C3 RC2 Tubeless Ready. And yes those numbers all mean something. C3 is Onza’s Cross Country Casing with 60TPI - sturdier, thicker sidewalls for a little more puncture resistance vs. the thinner and lighter 120TPI. RC2 denotes the dual compound rubber materials used in the tyre makeup: harder 65a in the center for durability and good rolling and softer 55a on the outsides for grip.

 

  • Weight750g
  • Size29 x 2.25
  • TPI60
  • BeadKevlar / foldable
  • Compounds65a/55a
  • PriceRRP R 650.00

 

At 750g per tyre they're on par with other similarly specced all rounders. Price wise they are also competitive considering the price tags on some top end tubeless tyres are in the neighbourhood of R 700-800.00

 

Fitment


The tyres were first fitted to a set of Easton EA70 XCTs and later to a pair of ZTR Crests and both were no trouble at all. Although I opted for some assistance from a tyre lever for that last little bit, getting the tyre onto the rim was possible completely by hand on either wheel. I ran them tubeless and when it came to inflation (which can be a pain without a compressor) a standard floor pump did the trick for both wheels.

 


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On the trails


My first few outings on these tyres were to a very wet and muddy Tokai. I was impressed by the grip even in the soggy conditions which Onza don't really class these tyres for. Thanks to the open tread pattern on the outer edges mud and dirt cleared well and they held on impressively well. In the really sticky clay-like stuff though, traction was limited as they struggled to dislodge the gunk.

 

In drier conditions I was quickly impressed with the rolling performance. What was first just a feeling of “woah, these are fast” was reinforced on the extended gravel roads of the Baviaans Kloof. On the open dirt roads they were fast rolling with good acceleration and none of the sluggishness slightly grippier tyres can add.

 

Through windy singletrack I found myself increasingly pushing the traction limits and confidently so. On a mixture of hard packed soil, slippery pine needles and roots, loose and sharp rocky sections they performed well and predictably. Only in very loose sand and very wet conditions did I find they began to lose contact.

 

For general trail and singletrack riding I found I got the best traction performance running them at lower pressures: usually 1.6-1.8 bar front and back depending on the terrain. Any higher and they tended to get overly slippery over rocks and roots (for reference I weigh in at around 73kg).

 

Durability


Having ridden close on 600km with these tyres over varied terrain so far they've held up well, but they have still got a lot of life in them. In terms of puncture resistance I’ve not had a single issue to date. So far I am very happy with the durability, but I’ll report back after a few thousand kilometers.

 


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In the end


In a short space of time I’ve become a big fan of these tyres. They are well suited to my riding habits delivering on the combination of grip and low rolling resistance Onza speak of. Those looking for more grip might opt for the beefier Ibex up front, but for my riding the Canis front and rear does the job well. Given the more wallet-friendly price and the impressive performance the Onza Canis delivers excellent value in an all-rounder tyre.

 

I won't be taking these off until they need replacing!

 






87 Comments

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, May 06 2016 12:22

120TPI, Rock? If so - that's why. 

RocknRolla, May 06 2016 12:24

I have a deer with no eyes.

 

I will have to check.

 

Front tire does not do this, exact same tire.

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, May 06 2016 12:30

I have a deer with no eyes.

 

I will have to check.

 

Front tire does not do this, exact same tire.

Back tire sidewall under more pressure therefore more likely to suffer from problem, IMO

Hamstring, May 06 2016 12:41

at joBerg2c last week had my front and back tyre let me down with sidewall cuts running at 2bar

 

still dig the tyre. 

mtbride, May 06 2016 12:44

Back tire sidewall under more pressure therefore more likely to suffer from problem, IMO

 

Ja had the same back tyre problem in rocky places up here in Gauteng, when running non-snakeskin Schwalbe's front and back. The back took a beating and was leaking like a sieve from the sidewalls, but the front was fine. It's about the back wheel not always followingthe same line as the front , where one would try and avoid as much sidewall strikes.

Vanzyl, May 06 2016 12:56

Need to replace my back tire, was thinking of the onza canis but from reading all the comments here im a bit skeptical, are people having sidewall cuts from the 120tpi or 60tpi tires????? Continental tires getting too expensive!

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, May 06 2016 01:19

Need to replace my back tire, was thinking of the onza canis but from reading all the comments here im a bit skeptical, are people having sidewall cuts from the 120tpi or 60tpi tires????? Continental tires getting too expensive!

120tpi is the toiletpaper version. 60 is the stronger. I'd recommend it all day long. 

cpelser, May 06 2016 04:24

Yeah my next set of tyres were also going to be Canis + Ibex, but now I'm having doubts...

 

Maybe Goma + Saguaro rather..

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, May 06 2016 04:26

Yeah my next set of tyres were also going to be Canis + Ibex, but now I'm having doubts...

Maybe Goma + Saguaro rather..


Don't. As long as you go for the 60tpi version you'll be fine. All the complaints are in the 120tpi version which are like toilet paper.

Pikey, May 06 2016 06:12

Back tyre Canis 60tpi through all sorts of rocks and roots no problems ,ibex front all the grip in the world .

RocknRolla, May 07 2016 10:45

After topping up sealant tyre seems to be holding pressure. Wife bombed it a couple of times when out a tvan gaalens last weekend, so I suppose it affected the sealant.

She has not complained about lack of grip, and she really tests them out properly. We have very rocky terrain up here, and it has been doing fine this far.

Not a bad tire all in all, but not something I will ride personally

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, May 07 2016 11:38

yeah, the bomb would have had an effect for sure.,

 

Oh - it makes a fantastic rear tyre, but agreed - wouldn't use it on the front myself unless I was doing XCM. 

Rouxenator, May 07 2016 10:31

Going back to LUST Crossmarks. I had these fitted less than 2 weeks ago. So thankful that it lasted throughout my 5th TransKaroo. Today the rear tyre got a cut in Grabouw. I need reliability above everything else

raptor-22, May 08 2016 06:55

"What tyre " debates make for great entertainment...

On za canis 120tpi see really good tyres if you run them with enough air.

They, like any other thin walled tyre , won't last if converted to tubeless. The 120tpi is a race day tyre. Not a training day for riders with no finesse. Think of them as tyres for 650b riders

Naas Vermaak, May 08 2016 05:26

Having read posts about sidewall cuts so many times on this hub and happening to ALL kinds of tyres I'm inclined to start think thinking that the occurrence of sidewall cuts is much more a skills/rider related issue than an actual shortcoming of the tyre.

 

Maybe the more experienced riders around here can jot down a couple of pointers on how to ride sensibly/cleverly/light to minimise sidewall cuts - that might just save us/me/you a whole lot of irritation/money instead of chopping and changing one "bad" tyre for another .

hayleyearth, May 08 2016 05:35

Likely a bit of bad luck, although I have heard from others using the 120tpi that with the thinner sidewalls they're susceptible to cuts. 

The thicker 60tpi I reviewed here only came off the bike in Feb this year. They held up impressively well in some seriously rocky terrain in Lesotho Sky 2014 and a bucket load of Epic training thereafter. 

I'd recommend opting for 60tpi if you'll be riding rockier trails.

 

 

I'd like to know what pressure (per rider weight) are these okes running that were getting these side wall cuts...

hayleyearth, May 08 2016 05:59

The rear tire on the missus's bike has been losing pressure of late, without any signs of puncture.

 

Last night after washing the bike, I found the "rabies" foam of leaky sidewalls.. so much that I could hear the air escape...

 

Tires are a couple of months old. Planning to take it back to the LBS in order to get some kind of resolve (new rear tire)

 

Was this pumped up with a hand/floor pump or CO2?

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, May 08 2016 06:13

Was this pumped up with a hand/floor pump or CO2?

C02, according to a later response. 

Sparki 1, May 08 2016 06:21

Having read posts about sidewall cuts so many times on this hub and happening to ALL kinds of tyres I'm inclined to start think thinking that the occurrence of sidewall cuts is much more a skills/rider related issue than an actual shortcoming of the tyre.
 
Maybe the more experienced riders around here can jot down a couple of pointers on how to ride sensibly/cleverly/light to minimise sidewall cuts - that might just save us/me/you a whole lot of irritation/money instead of chopping and changing one "bad" tyre for another .

What tyres are u running Naas?

hayleyearth, May 08 2016 06:34

C02, according to a later response. 

 

Oh ja, I see now.

 

People should know by now that CO2 'leaks' more through tyres than normal air. 

Naas Vermaak, May 08 2016 06:36

What tyres are u running Naas?

Schwalbes mostly, both Racing R & Rocket R, both are SS. Have tried an IKON for the TK at the back to gain on less rolling resistance - kept it on for yesterday's Trucape - had no issues.

raptor-22, May 08 2016 06:59

I have run the EVO Scwalbe RR and never had a problem with them. Too low pressure and they just skwirm about on the rim. They need around 23-25psi to even begin to feel like they doing anything.

 

I now have the SS version. Run those at 20 psi - no grip.

run them at 23-25 psi, hey presto grip and no punctures or sidewalls failures.

 

Strange that that is the exact pressure Schwalbe recommends as a minimum......wow. would never have though the people who designed the tyre know more than the end user.

 

Same with the Canis.

 

shirts not rocket science. Read and apply. go ride

 

 

sorry for the sarcasm but each time I see someone with a blown side wall its on technical terrain and tyres look and are flat. But a friend whose brother in law's cousin rides with a guy who works with the 2nd cousin of the wife of a guy at a tyre brand said lower is better...

hayleyearth, May 08 2016 07:04

I have run the EVO Scwalbe RR and never had a problem with them. Too low pressure and they just skwirm about on the rim. They need around 23-25psi to even begin to feel like they doing anything.

 

I now have the SS version. Run those at 20 psi - no grip.

run them at 23-25 psi, hey presto grip and no punctures or sidewalls failures.

 

Strange that that is the exact pressure Schwalbe recommends as a minimum......wow. would never have though the people who designed the tyre know more than the end user.

 

Same with the Canis.

 

shirts not rocket science. Read and apply. go ride

 

 

sorry for the sarcasm but each time I see someone with a blown side wall its on technical terrain and tyres look and are flat. But a friend whose brother in law's cousin rides with a guy who works with the 2nd cousin of the wife of a guy at a tyre brand said lower is better...

 

Had a giggle...love the post  :thumbup:

PhilipV, May 08 2016 08:13



sorry for the sarcasm but each time I see someone with a blown side wall its on technical terrain and tyres look and are flat. But a friend whose brother in law's cousin rides with a guy who works with the 2nd cousin of the wife of a guy at a tyre brand said lower is better...


I remember a random guy (client, not a salesperson) trying to convince me that crossmarks are simply the best tyres, and give amazing grip in corners, but that they shouldn't be inflated more than 1.2 bar. I told him if he rides like that and doesn't feel his tyres folding in corners, then he is not riding hard enough and need to loosen the handbrake. Apparently I am a box.

BenReaper, May 08 2016 09:32

I am also a big fan of the Crossmark because of it being IMHO the most robust tyre I've encountered, it is capable and suitable for most of our rocky and clad stone terrain in the Breederiver Valley in the dry summer conditions.

Having said that I wont run them on my bike because they have little to no grip in wet, muddy or loose gravel terrain and are quit heavy.

I am quite fond of my Vittoria tyres as they give a good combonation between strenght, grip and little rolling resistance. Would however not mind giving the ONZA's a go to see what the hype is about.I must admit, I quite like the tread pattern on both the CANIS and IBEX models, they look very grippy.

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