Review: Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo FSR 6Fattie

In 2015 Specialized announced the Turbo Levo, a range of electric pedal-assist trail bikes, and have since rolled out several variations. These include a women’s specific, a fat bike, a hardtail, a full suspension 29er, and a full-suspension 27.5-plus model which we spent last Friday afternoon riding at the spectacular Jonkershoek trails.

 

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The Bike


The Specialized Turbo Levo FSR 6Fattie is available in S-Works, Expert, and Comp specification levels. All models utilize the same M5 Premium Aluminium frame designed around Specialized's FSR suspension with 135mm of rear travel.

 

When developing the Turbo Levo range of bikes, Specailized's goal was to design a mountain bike integrating pedal assist rather than an e-bike with mountain bike components bolted on. To us it may sound obvious, but in other countries where e-bikes are fairly common, many e-mountain bikes have their roots in commuting and are not suitable mountain bikes.

 

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The Turbo Levo FSR 6Fattie is based on the Stumpjumper FSR 6Fattie which is the 27.5 plus version of the Stumpjumper FSR - a bike that has been part of Specialized's line up for more than a decade. The challenge for their engineers was to integrate a motor and battery into a custom frame design in a clean and functional manner. And they succeeded. Apart from the bulk around the bottom bracket, the Turbo Levo FSR 6Fattie is instantly recognisable as a Specialized and has managed to retain the stance of its siblings.

 

The Battery

 


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The battery pack comes in two capacity models: a 504Wh model for the S-Works and Expert bikes and a slightly lower 460Wh for the Comp specification. The Turbo Levo battery conveniently clicks into place via a cam-lock and a mini 15mm thru axle that can be loosened with a 5mm hex key. This has two benefits.

 

First, it makes for a rattle free design with the battery securely locked in place which, along with the quietest motor I have experienced on an e-bike, makes for a pleasant ride.

 

Secondly, as the battery is removable you will be able to swop it out during ultra long rides, when electricity is not available or when the battery starts to lose its charge capacity. You need not worry though, as Specialized estimates that each battery should be at 100 percent performance for roughly 700 complete charge cycles. That means if you were to completely deplete the battery every day, you would get almost two years of use before it begins to fade. A full charge is said to take only 3.5 hours using either the bike's charge port or with the battery removed (useful when maintaining multiple batteries).

 


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Pedal Assist

 

There are three pedal assist power modes to select from while riding: Eco, Trail and Turbo. Using the default setting, these offer 30%, 60% and 100% of your effort as assistance respectively. This, though, is highly customisable through the Mission Control App which I discuss in detail further below. For the bike to detect your pedalling effort, torque is measured in the motor at the crank while speed is measured by a sensor hidden in the dropout with a magnet attached directly to the brake rotor, doing away with a spoke magnet.

 

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The 36V 250W Brose motor weighs 3.4 kgs and although it is not the most powerful model available, the output and characteristics suit the bike perfectly. Using a gear reduction of 3:1 to increase torque, the motor drives a toothed pulley on the crank with a Gates belt drive which is one reason the motor is so quiet. The motor also uses two sprag clutches – one on the crank and one on the motor. This ensures that when you pedal without the motor engaged, you are only pedaling the drivetrain without any extra drag from the motor.

 

The battery is chipped for use with both Bluetooth and ANT+, so connecting with a smartphone or GPS is simple. There is a built-in power meter, and the battery constantly communicates with your smartphone or Garmin head unit over ANT+ on a “fake” channel that, once paired, monitors battery life and allows you to toggle between power modes. It is reported that Garmin will be updating software to better handle e-bikes with dedicated channels.

 

The frame

 

All this technology is fitted into a tweaked Stumpjumper 6Fattie frame with clean lines and internal routing for all the hoses and outers. The frame comes with an integrated chainstay protector, as is becoming the norm these days, and a rock guard downtube protector. Compared to the standard non-assist bike, the rear stays get beefed-up main pivots and double-row bearings. Unique to the e-bike frames are bridges between the stays to help handle the extra weight of the motor and battery.

 

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Thanks to the motor’s diminutive size and integration into the frame, Specialized could move it slightly ahead of the bottom bracket and combine it with the battery nestled in the underside of the downtube for one cohesive package. By design, it also allows for shorter chainstays than most of the competition while putting all the weight where it will least affect the bike's feel - low and in the centre of the wheelbase.

 

Specialized's designers were very specific in making this look like a regular mountain bike. As a result you won't find a display unit or thumb control on the handlebars. Instead the three modes are easily accessible by push button on the side of the battery as well as control integration with some Garmin head units. If you really want control on the handlebar, there is a small remote available as an optional extra.

 

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There are three buttons on the left hand side of the downtube. A power button to switch the bike on and off and and +/- buttons to switch between the three available power modes. In a very clever minimalist design there are ten LED lights that surround the mode buttons, each representing 10% battery life. They are also responsible for showing which mode you are in, with the two lights at the bottom showing that you are in ECO mode, six LEDs represent Trail mode and all ten for Turbo mode. When selecting one of the three modes the lights momentarily display which mode you are in before going back to showing battery life.

 

Mission Control App


Available in Google's Play Store and Apple's iStore, the Specialized Mission Control app offers a wide range of features and allows full control over the Turbo Levo system. This is a great piece of technology and sets Specialized apart from all other e-bikes currently available on the market.

 

Smart Control
The Smart Control algorithm allows you to set your desired ride time or distance, how much battery life you would like to have left at the end of your ride and it will adjust the motor and battery output accordingly by monitoring the battery in 10-second intervals and metering its life accordingly. No need to worry whether you will make it home.

 


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Tune
Allows you to customise your motor characteristics like acceleration response, maximum motor output or mode-setting. With its "Acceleration Response" you can set how much vigour you would like the motor to kick in with. You can also set each of the three modes' (Eco, Trail, and Turbo) wattage assistance to your own liking, if you don't want the default Eco at 30%, Trail at 60% and Turbo at 100%.

 

Navigation
The app includes a comprehensive navigation (POI, search address, language coach and previous rides) in combination with an extensive and customisable on board computer

 

Connectivity
Strava integration and automatic upload opportunities to dedicated e-bike category and the ability to copy your route or ride from Strava over to the App and Smart Control will ensure your battery will last the full distance.

 

Diagnose
A comprehensive diagnosis system gives you immediate feedback and an overview of the motor, battery and system health.

 

Ride History
Gives you a detailed overview of your fitness and ride history.

 


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Components


As you would expect from an S-Works model, the bike we had for the day sits at the top of the line-up. See the full specification table below.

 

Fork: The bike comes fitted with a RockShox Pike RCT3 with 140mm of travel. This was our first experience with a RockShox fork featuring the 110mm boost axle width having previously reviewed the 100mm width fork. As one would expect by now, the Pike delivered great composure and support through its full travel range and showed no signs of flex. With no internal changes over previous models, I would expect it to be ultra-reliable with little TLC needed to keep it performing at its best.

 

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Shock: A Custom Fox Float does duty on the S-Works model. Befitting of the bike it is the top of the range Factory DPS with Kashima coating, boost valve and Specailzied's Autosag function. For those not familiar with Autosag, have a look at the quick video guide here. In short, most shocks have a transfer port that balances the positive and negative air chambers inside the shock. The Autosag system works on that balance. You over-inflate the positive air chamber so the bike is totally extended, the riders sits on the bike in their riding gear with the shock fully open, then presses the Autosag valve and it bleeds out the excess air. Once the air is released, it automatically balances the positive and negative chambers to the sag-level set by Specialized (which is around 20% for an Epic and 25% for a Stumpjumper).

 

Drivetrain: At the heart of the Turbo Levo's drivetrain sits SRAM's XX1 components powered by a custom Praxis crankset running a 32T steel chainring to better cope with the torque forces. The frame is dedicated 1x and can run anything from 32 to 38 tooth chainrings. The XX1 drivetrain performed flawlessly with quick, positive shifts. I did not notice any issues when shifting under load although thanks to the power on offer in Turbo mode, chances are that you won't be shifting under load too often.

 


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Brakes: Complementing the SRAM drivetrain is a set of SRAM Guide RS Carbon brakes paired with a 200mm rotor in front and 180mm on the rear. The bigger rotors do an excellent job slowing the 22 kg bike. Feel, modulation and consistent performance are all very good. Lever shape is down to personal preference, but I found the carbon levers to be excellent.

 

Wheels: The Traverse SL Fattie 650b 148 carbon wheels are lightweight, tubeless ready rims build around a 148mm boost rear hub standard and feature a zero bead hook design. Internal width is 30mm with 24 spokes in front and 28 rear. The rear hub is a CNC machined alloy body with DT Swiss 350 internals featuring a 54T quick engagement ratchet system. Claimed weight for the complete wheelset is a very competitive 1537g with a 108kg rider weight limit. The wheels worked well on the trails with good engagement and no signs of flex.

 


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Tyres: Specialized fit a 6Fattie Purgatory Control in front and 6Fattie Ground Control on the rear. Both are 60TPI, tubeless ready and 3.0" wide. I found this to be a great combination for traction and speed with the tyre and rim working together to offer mountains of grip.

 

Seatpost: Specialized's internally routed Command Post IRcc comes standard on all Levo models - something I'm glad to see. A nice touch is the gear lever like remote that sits on the left where a front gear shifter would be. It makes using it intuitive and natural as minimal hand movement is required to operate with your thumb. I found the return speed too fast and would prefer it to be a bit slower for health and practical use reasons.

 


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Saddle: The 143mm wide Body Geometry Henge Expert with hollow Ti rails was very comfortable from the outset and should suit a wide range of sit bone widths.

 

Cockpit: A 750mm carbon bar with 8-degree backsweep, 6-degree upsweep, 10mm rise is used on the S-Works model. The sweep and rise feel good making for a steady comfortable ride. The length of the standard stem is 75mm.

 

On the Trail


Although the standard assist settings are good out the box, those looking to get the most out of a Turbo bike should install, pair and setup the Mission Control app which only takes a couple of minutes. Each bike can only be paired to one app to ensure no one fiddles with your settings.

 

Once the bike is set up - just turn on the power, choose a mode, and start pedaling. The pedal-assist will kick in when it senses torque on the pedals and detects forward motion via the speed sensor.

 

From the first "assist" it was clear that the Mission Control plays a big part in separating the Turbo Levo from the crowd. With the "Acceleration Response" setting I was able to reduce the unsettling kick-in on the first few pedal strokes that many e-bikes suffer from giving it a smoother feel more like a traditional pedal bike. When climbing fire roads, the kick-in experienced on other e-bikes does not seem to be a big issue. But when the trail gets narrow and you have to navigate tight turns, you will need to be careful with pedal strokes as the awakening motor can catch you off guard. This is not a problem on the Specialized. Power delivery is smooth and assistance gradually picks up - a major plus. Not only does it make for a safer and more enjoyable ride, but it adds to the regular mountain bike feel of the Turbo Levo, allowing the rider to focus on what they are there to do, ride their bike.

 

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Those who have spent a day riding in the Jonkershoek valley will know what the climbs there do to the legs. Using the full assistance mode makes light work of the steepest climbs and gets you to the trailhead fresher and faster. After the first few ascents, I dialled it back to the Trail or Eco mode to get a reasonable workout with some assistance to take the edge off. It was such a joy popping out at the bottom of Neverending Story and thinking "let me do that again", turn around and head back up without any concern of blowing up on the climb.

 

The motor really is frictionless with no signs of drag when free wheeling or pedaling unassisted. When the Euro speed limit of 25km/h kicks in the motor simply switches off making the drivetrain feel like any non-assisted bike. Other e-bikes I've tried have a form of retarder build in that will slow you down once you go above 25 km/h. The Turbo Levo, however, will allow you to pick up speed at will with zero interference with your ride.

 

The pedal assist does not have to remain on at all times for the bike to be fun. Going down single track with the motor off, you realise just how good a mountain bike the Turbo Levo 6Fattie is. The suspension soaks up everything in your path while the extra volume of the tyres allows for very rough line choices without the feeling of being shaken off the bike. Even with the longer rear (compared to its non-motorized sibling) the bike never felt cumbersome through tighter sections and, as long as you are willing to move your weight around, the bike turns with razor sharp accuracy. There is very little indication (even with the motor off) from the feel of the ride that you are piloting a 22 kg bike.

 

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Climbing is good with the shock's tune combating any sign of bob. When the climbing gets rough, the 6Fattie will out climb the best in its class thanks to the extra grip and traction on offer with the bike only showing signs of its meaty tyres on faster, open climbs.

 

On single track the 3.0" plus tyres let the rider carry extra speed through rough sections, around berms and corners. This helps to maintain momentum and speed meaning less yo-yo effect of slowing down and speeding up again.

 

 

Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo FSR 6Fattie specifications:

SWorks Turbo Levo FSR 6Fattie.jpg
[spec_list][spec_list_row=Battery]Custom Specialized, 504Wh, ANT+/BT module, IP 67[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Brake levers"]SRAM Guide RS Carbon, carbon lever, reach adjust, cartridge bearing lever pivot[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Cassette]SRAM XX1, 11-speed, 10-42t[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Chain]SRAM PC-XX1, 11-speed, w/ PowerLink[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Charger]Custom Specialized, 42V4A, w/ Rosenberger plug[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Crankset]Custom Praxis, steel 1x11 32T ring, 104 BCD spider[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Fork]RockShox Pike RCT3, 140mm travel, tapered aluminum steerer, 15x110mm Maxle Ultimate thru-axle[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Front brake"]SRAM Guide RS Carbon, metallic pads, 200mm Centerline rotor[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Front hub"]Roval Traverse, 15mm thru-axle, 24h[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Front tyre"]Specialized 6Fattie Purgatory Control, 60TPI, 2Bliss Ready, folding bead, 650bx3.0"[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Grips]Specialized Sip Grip, light lock-on, half-waffle, S/M: regular thickness, L/XL: XL thickness[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Handlebars]Specialized FACT carbon, 8-degree backsweep, 6-degree upsweep, 10mm rise, 31.8mm, 750mm width[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Headset]Hella Flush, 1-1/8" and 1-1/2" threadless, Campy style upper w/ 1-1/2" lower, cartridge bearings[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Inner tubes"]Standard, Presta valve[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Motor]Exclusive, custom tuned for Specialized, Trail Tune, 250W[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Pedals]Nylon, CEN std., w/ toe clips[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Rear brake"]SRAM Guide RS Carbon, metallic pads, 180mm Centerline rotor[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Rear derailleur"]SRAM XX1, 11-speed[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Rear hub"]Roval Traverse SL 148, DT Swiss Star Ratchet, 54t engagement, SRAM XX1 driver body, 28h[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Rear shock"]Custom FOX FLOAT Factory DPS, AUTOSAG, Rx Trail Tune, Boost Valve, Kashima coating, 197x47.6mm[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Rear tyre"]Specialized 6Fattie Ground Control, 60TPI, 2Bliss Ready, folding bead, 650bx3.0"[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Rims]Roval Traverse SL 38 650b, carbon disc, 38mm wide, 24/28h[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Saddle]Body Geometry Henge Expert, hollow Ti rails, 143mm[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Seat binder"]Specialized, 7050 alloy, single bolt, 34.9mm[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Seatpost]Command Post IRcc, cruiser control technology, micro-adjust height adjustable, alien head design, bottom mount cable routing, remote adjust SRL lever, 30.9mm, S: 100mm travel, M/L/XL: 125mm[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="Shift levers"]SRAM XX1, 11-speed, trigger[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Spokes]DT Swiss Revolution[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Stem]Syntace F109, 6-degree rise[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row="User interface/remote"]Integrated Trail display, 10 LED battery display, Mission Control iOS or Android app[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Wiring]Custom harness, w/ Rosenberger plug[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row=Measured weight]22.4 kg[/spec_list_row][/spec_list]




77 Comments

NicoBoshoff, Jun 01 2016 10:09

That must be one of the nicest looking motorbikes I've ever seen.  I wonder if Specialized also make mountain bikes.

 

(Spare me the "It's not a motorbike, it's a pedal-assist bike" BS.  It has a motor. It's a bike.)

 

Something to think about though:  When we go riding, how often do we go riding alone?  Most of the time we ride with friends, because this is after all a social endeavour.  So if you're the one t*sser that rocks up with your luigat fiets so that you can session Jonkers 10 times, what are your mates going to do, assuming they weren't all dumb enough to spend money on this?  They're going to carry on as normal and wait for you at the coffee shop I guess.

 

So this bike should really come with a disclaimer - please be aware that riding this bike will result in mostly solo rides, unless you can find an e-bike support group somewhere.

Iwan Kemp, Jun 01 2016 10:09

:thumbup:

NicoBoshoff, Jun 01 2016 10:17

Right, now that I've made my position clear let me add this:  The Levo is without a doubt the best looking, and from what I've heard, best executed, iterations of the e-bike genre. 

 

I reckon this will be great for event photographers that struggle to get to the sharp end of the race to get the shots - especially the EWS guys (although I reckon Sven Martin will glass you if you give him this to ride).

Danger Dassie, Jun 01 2016 11:26

Great tech and whatnot, the potential trickle down is fantastic for those with mobility challenges or commuting.
For recreation though, it's very much contrary to the low impact use and carbon footprint idea of using a bicycle. Feeds into a very superficial culture ...  

Manufacturers need to really consider their motives with this kind of thing. 

NicoBoshoff, Jun 01 2016 11:43

Instant gratification comes to mind.  The "I want it NOW and I ain't working for it" generation.

Pure Savage, Jun 01 2016 12:13

Great product, can see them taking off! Amazing! 

 

Lots of people with crystal balls on the hub, able to see what will happen with e-bikes on trails in the future.

 

Tell us more  :thumbup:  :thumbup:

nonky, Jun 01 2016 12:13

Thanks for an HONEST review of: (i) a Spez; and (ii) an e-bike...lots of e-bike haters out there on the interwebs, so an objective and fair appraisal of this bike is overdue and much appreciated.

 

Would I buy one?  

Now?  Nope, not a chance.    

When I'm 55?  Maybe.

When I'm 65?  Probably.

NicoBoshoff, Jun 01 2016 12:16

Thanks for an HONEST review of: (i) a Spez; and (ii) an e-bike...lots of e-bike haters out there on the interwebs, so an objective and fair appraisal of this bike is overdue and much appreciated.

 

Would I buy one?  

Now?  Nope, not a chance.    

When I'm 55?  Maybe.

When I'm 65?  Probably.

I reckon if you keep riding honest bikes chances are you won't need to buy one at 65.  Plenty of pinners around  qualifying for pensioner discounts.

Speeltyd, Jun 01 2016 12:51

Just on the side - what is the view of the Race Organisers on the use of e-bikes? I suppose when competing for the podium it's a No. But what of the other start groups?

Danger Dassie, Jun 01 2016 12:57

Just on the side - what is the view of the Race Organisers on the use of e-bikes? I suppose when competing for the podium it's a No. But what of the other start groups?

 

It's a no.
Enduro event DQ'd a rider for using an e-bike on practice runs. 

Danger Dassie, Jun 01 2016 12:58

Thoughts from elsewhere, 

 

"The E-Bike thing, absolutely has a place in the world. 
Great for low impact commuting and an important tool in changing heavily industrialised transport planning. 
They also create accesibility to the bicycle in a number of ways for those with mobility issues, whether it's through illness or physical challenges. It allows them to discover the joy of cycling.
(Edit) E-bikes also have incredible potential as a tool in law/conservation management, EMS and event production.

 

But as far as a recreational tool for 'able' bodied riders who are otherwise healthy and mobile. No. 
It's counter intuitive and (arguably) too big an enviromental impact, from manufacturing to use. On some level it feeds into a superficial culture which defeats the entire object of the simple pleasure of pedaling a bicycle.

 

My personal objective(ish) opinion, ultimately though it's down to the individuals choice, not mine. I know, opinions are like assholes, we all have them."

Nick, Jun 01 2016 01:05

Just on the side - what is the view of the Race Organisers on the use of e-bikes? I suppose when competing for the podium it's a No. But what of the other start groups?


It's a no.
Enduro event DQ'd a rider for using an e-bike on practice runs.

 
There is a rider in the Cape who has done a number of stage races on his e-bike. He pre-warns the organisers and then makes sure to act reasonably on the climbs so as to not annoy other riders.
 
But he's an anomaly for now, not sure how well this approach will work if the numbers grow.

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Jun 01 2016 01:07

There is a rider in the Cape who has done a number of stage races on his e-bike. He pre-warns the organisers and then makes sure to acts reasonably on the climbs so as to not annoy other riders.
 
But he's an anomaly for now, not sure how well this approach will work if the numbers grow.

Easy - separate class.

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Jun 01 2016 01:10

I fear for a near future where singletracks are choked by unskilled, slow, fat rich people on E-bikes. If I see one on a trail don't expect any pleasant comments. 

 

E bikes are going to ruin it for everyone that has worked hard for their skill and fitness levels. And for what, so that the machine can make more money for already well lined pockets.

 

Sorry Iwan, I like your articles, but I don't like your stance on E bikes.

To be fair, that's what any mass participation thing with ANY singletrack looks like without e bikes. So there wouldn't be much change.

 

As for the technical singletracks? Fat unfit non skilled riders still won't do those, as they don't want to. Even the fit non skilled riders don't want to do them. I doubt e-bikes will change that.

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Jun 01 2016 01:18

I can honestly see the appeal for these sorts of bikes. Capable, well balanced machines that just ehlp you get to the top that much more refreshed.

 

For days that you want to concentrate on shuttling (without the need for a vehicle) and therefore get to the top with minimal exertion, and work on your descending skills, I reckon it's an absolutely BRILLIANT bike.

 

For whole day rides XC style / with mates / up AND down, as well as training? Normal bike please. I want to get fitter so that I can descend better, plus it's lekker exercise.

 

Those with mobility issues? Bloody awesome.

 

Will they change the face of MTB? I doubt it. You still have to pedal, and on the technical bits it's still mostly down to rider skill - which an e-mtb won't change. You also won't see them "tearing up the trails" like motos, as the speed limit is 25kph and if the kick-in is moderated properly there won't be as much loss of traction. We all lose traction on the climbs anyway, and this is a mid-fat bike as well...More traction. Less rippage.

 

But would I buy one? If I had the spare cash and nothing else to spend it on... Sure. But I'd use it for shuttling Jonkers multiple times (that CLIMB!!!) and so on, so that I could concentrate on my skills development without worry of being blown from the ride up.

 

Would it be my primary ride? Probably not.

 

but I want a bakkie first.

Captain Fastbastard Mayhem, Jun 01 2016 01:20

TBH if I had the cash I'd probably buy one JUST so that I can session Jonkers & Steilte multiple times in a day.

JXV, Jun 01 2016 01:28

Easy - separate class.

Call it 'sweeper class'. They start after the kiddies ride and clean all the litter and tape from the course.....

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

_C50_, Jun 01 2016 08:19

If I was 100% healthy with no medical issues that could prevent me from enjoying mountain biking, I would not consider this for a second. These bikes could give people with health or medical issues the opportunity to enjoy mountain biking. I met one such guy last year doing a mtb event on an e-bike, which he otherwise would not have been able to do, because of a health issue. He just wanted to ride and enjoy like the rest us. I'm all for that.

Wayne Potgieter, Jun 01 2016 08:46

I like it. Its has its place in the world.

It must be a great way to put a smile on your face.

It could also be used as a training aid. Dial down the amount it assists over time as you get stronger.

Will it ever replace the true excercise of cycling...no.

Is it a great way to spend an entire day out in a forest exploring...yes.

Nice review Iwan.

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

KingTJ, Jun 01 2016 08:48

That must be one of the nicest looking motorbikes I've ever seen.  I wonder if Specialized also make mountain bikes.

 

(Spare me the "It's not a motorbike, it's a pedal-assist bike" BS.  It has a motor. It's a bike.)

 

Something to think about though:  When we go riding, how often do we go riding alone?  Most of the time we ride with friends, because this is after all a social endeavour.  So if you're the one t*sser that rocks up with your luigat fiets so that you can session Jonkers 10 times, what are your mates going to do, assuming they weren't all dumb enough to spend money on this?  They're going to carry on as normal and wait for you at the coffee shop I guess.

 

So this bike should really come with a disclaimer - please be aware that riding this bike will result in mostly solo rides, unless you can find an e-bike support group somewhere.

shoulkd be banned on MTb trails...it belongs with tthe mx bikes

Joeboy69, Jun 01 2016 09:12

Use the motor to get to work without sweating. Pedal the heavy bike home for the workout. Or use the motor on a weekend to reach roads you wouldn't normally be able to and then enjoy your cycle there. Motor back home. I would love one but can't justify the expense.

Wonder why they didn't go for a 500w motor though. Need to win the lotto!

Iwan Kemp, Jun 02 2016 08:30

...

Wonder why they didn't go for a 500w motor though. Need to win the lotto!

 

Read that after extensive testing they felt the 250w motor suited the characteristics they were after better. 

Pure Savage, Jun 02 2016 09:15

Unless someone pulls a Femke Van den Driessche and someone sneaks a motor into your bike its is not going to change the enjoyment or access to any of your beloved trails. A knob will be a knob on normal bike or a ebike. 

 

If people had the same vigor and disgust for known doppers riding their trails  as they do for ebikes our sport would be a lot better off. 

Rebelking, Jun 02 2016 10:56

Took the Levo for a spin this morning & it was brilliant!! Kept it on Eco (the low setting) except for one super steep 20% average grade climb a notched it up to trail- the middle setting.  Total distance 17.6km with 550m ascent.

 

My review:

 

1.) Very nimble on the singletracks!!

 

2.) You definitely still get a good work out. I am fit & my average heart rate(168 / Max 193) was higher than my usual morning rides. I did gun it up the climbs for "research" purposes though.

 

3.) There is no way you can cause damage to the trails in terms of "wheel spin" like you would on a Mx bike so stop comparing it to a "Ktm" or whatever! 

 

4.) Will I buy one of I had the money... YES. It just opens up so many possibilities to have fun in a limited time.

 

To all the haters.... go ride one :)

Pure Savage, Jun 02 2016 11:05

Took the Levo for a spin this morning & it was brilliant!! Kept it on Eco (the low setting) except for one super steep 20% average grade climb a notched it up to trail- the middle setting.  Total distance 17.6km with 550m ascent.

 

My review:

 

1.) Very nimble on the singletracks!!

 

2.) You definitely still get a good work out. I am fit & my average heart rate(168 / Max 193) was higher than my usual morning rides. I did gun it up the climbs for "research" purposes though.

 

3.) There is no way you can cause damage to the trails in terms of "wheel spin" like you would on a Mx bike so stop comparing it to a "Ktm" or whatever! 

 

4.) Will I buy one of I had the money... YES. It just opens up so many possibilities to have fun in a limited time.

 

To all the haters.... go ride one :)

 

DO NOT BRING COMMON SENSE HERE!!

 

The hub prefers fear mongering, crazy predictions and wild speculation.