Anti-Doping Rule Violation: Tyronne White

Cycling South Africa reports that Tyronne White has been found guilty of an anti-doping rule violation after an in-competition test conducted on 30 April 2016 confirmed the presence of the Glucocorticoid, Dexamethasone.

The SAIDS Independent Doping Hearing Panel imposed a period of ineligibility of 18 months, commencing on 14 December 2016. Mr. White is therefore suspended and prohibited from competing and administering in the sport of Cycling as well as in any other sport in South Africa and Internationally from 14 December 2016 until 13 June 2018. This decision may be appealed by Mr. White, the UCI, WADA and SAIDS.

 

Cycling South Africa respects the independence of the SAIDS process and will respect the outcome. Cycling SA further reiterates its zero-tolerance approach to doping in sport and will continue working with SAIDS in the promotion of a drug-free sport via its awareness and extensive testing programmes.




278 Comments

V12man, Dec 28 2016 10:35

True . . . very many uses. I am not arguing with you.


But as an anti-emetic ? In a first aid setting at a race.
Surely metoclopramide, cyclizine, promethazine, ondansetron is preferred anti-emetics available on the market in this context?


I am not going to second guess why what drugs were chosen when and by whom for what purpose... It would be of academic and legal interest only - pretty sure that will be addressed in an appeal - doesn't take responsibility away from the athlete however.

V12man, Dec 28 2016 10:42

Well he still gets full support from his bike sponsor. Maybe they know something we dont.


Wouldn't be the first bike sponsor to support their athletes - see the support David George and then Kevin Evans got from Scott... until the lies were discovered...

The above does not imply anything about Ty's issues - it's just a reminder...

RockHound, Dec 28 2016 11:14

Here's a fresh spin;

I inadvertently took a banned substance
Given to me by a mecic who had my best interests at heart
Very sorry for bringing a sport already tarnished, into disrepute
Will take whatever sanctions is served to me
I had no intention of cheating

The end.......

What happened to Ematrol? Got me to the end of a Dusi.....mind you the closest I came to a podium was parking a tiger on it!

lerouc, Dec 29 2016 05:46

does this mean people that use thule bike racks paid for the drugs?  :ph34r:

SwissVan, Dec 29 2016 06:25

Here's a fresh spin;
I inadvertently took a banned substance
Given to me by a mecic who had my best interests at heart
Very sorry for bringing a sport already tarnished, into disrepute
Will take whatever sanctions is served to me
I had no intention of cheating
The end.......
What happened to Ematrol? Got me to the end of a Dusi.....mind you the closest I came to a podium was parking a tiger on it!


Ha!
"I had no intention of cheating"
But you still continued and finished - Note I'm not picking on you, just using your post

This is a situation thousands of participants have been through in any of the many endurance events that take place every year....

Funny how it only matters if an athlete at the pointy end of the results makes this decision (remember the golden rule: it's the athletes responsibility).

Popular opinion on athletes getting caught in these kind of circumstances is that if you are sick enough to need medication then you should not be taking part or should bale out...

I wonder how many participants can honestly put up their hand if someone asked:
"Who has never taking anything illegal to help them finish..."

No if's and buts....no excuses about being a fun competitor.... it's a hands up or hands down question?

PhilipV, Dec 29 2016 06:42

Call me a hardened cynic, but I call BS on his excuse.
It is just soooo convenient that there was a medic that gave him a banned substance that should shoulder all his blame.
Nee meneer, ek dink die laaitie lieg.

scotty, Dec 29 2016 07:18

Should be easy enough to prove, I'm sure the medical set up for the race has records of who they treated, what their condition was and what they dispensed. The records will show if he was treated as claimed. Like the medic's priority is to treat him, if I'm suffering from nausea and dehydration, the last thing on my mind would be to sit down and analyze what was issued to me.

 

Does not absolve him, he is a professional athlete but unless it can be proven that he specifically requested the medication then there could be some leeway. 

Mudsimus, Dec 29 2016 07:52

The drugs administered by the race Dr was one of the points of contention during the hearing. Either there were no proof or it wasnt bought.

Mudsimus, Dec 29 2016 08:08

And surely, if true, this Dr must be barred from ever practising at any sport event again? Rule nr 1, know what is on the Wada list?

The Crazy German, Dec 29 2016 08:37

The drugs administered by the race Dr was one of the points of contention during the hearing. Either there were no proof or it wasnt bought.

Its not about that, its not a valid excuse point. Even if administered by race doc it doesn't clear him under regulations. Several cases in the past at best used as a mitigating circumstance leading to a shorter ban. Or a very lengthy Proces.

 

One off the yates brothers still got banned. Bjorn leukemans took years to get cleared even if when the doc admitted error and got fired http://www.velonatio...itive-test.aspx He had long served (some) of the ban before he got cleared

Reg Lizard, Dec 29 2016 09:38

Mooi man :thumbdown:

Neverfit, Dec 29 2016 09:38

As the participating athlete - you are responsible for what you take - no matter who presents it to you - be it a medic under a tree, a waiter at the juice bar or a friend in the parking lot - you consume it, so it's your responsibility.

 

I do however think there should be a list of allowed medicines for each common race related symptom, surely dehydration, nausea, cramps etc are to be expected. These should be treatable, without preventing the athlete from continuing. the race organizers can, in consultation with doctors, inform the medical teams of the required meds to be administered well in advance.. The medics/doctors are well trained and know their meds - that's what they do - so they should be able to treat "normal" race symptoms using prescribed meds vs stock medical kit meds without compromising their quality and level of care.

If, for what ever reason, you need some additional meds, the doctor should be able to stop you from continuing for medical reasons. Again - they are the medical staff - they know what can and cannot be done safely - medically.

Think of F1, rugby etc where the doctor CAN make the call to refuse the athlete to continue. 

 

The responsibility ends with the athlete, and so it should - but to expect every athlete to be a medical doctor whilst riding is not helping.

Mntboy, Dec 29 2016 09:45

True - you did- mostly my point is about anti doping being specifically NOT the medics concern at all.

The medics concern must be ONLY the well being of the patient - this clearly has to be ethically applied - and in the case of a team doctor/team medical staff, very carefully too - but in the case of race emergency medical staff - anti doping concerns should be the least of their problems - to be blunt they should ignore anti doping regs completely to provide the best possible medical care to the patient.

Interesting point V12man.

So here's a question I've had running through my head: in this instance would it not have been best if the medic/race doctor had the authority to pull a racer out of the race regardless of the level of he is racing at? Or is that going tad overboard with the race doctor's responsibilities?

Sent from my SM-J200H using Tapatalk

Jaco-fiets, Dec 29 2016 09:51

I agree that at the end of the day it is the athlete's responsibility but......................

 

When you are dr at a sanctioned event and you treat the athletes you always have the athlete's best interest at heart (you took an oath anyway). Sometimes (I would think most times in serious conditions) these treatments probably contain some sort of a banned substance.

 

My point is that surely the dr at these race must be clued up on what is banned or not and inform the athlete of the best treatment and that it contains a banned substance. Then it is the athletes responsibility if he wants it or not (and sign for it).

 

This just makes sense to me

Thor Buttox, Dec 29 2016 10:27

Interesting point V12man.

So here's a question I've had running through my head: in this instance would it not have been best if the medic/race doctor had the authority to pull a racer out of the race regardless of the level of he is racing at? Or is that going tad overboard with the race doctor's responsibilities?

Sent from my SM-J200H using Tapatalk

This I think is the main point. A doctor should always have the person's best health issues at heart, and should record it as such. He should also inform the client, especially in a race circumstance whether it is on the banned list or not.

There is a grey area where we forget that pro athletes are humans who also do have valid medical conditions caused by things outside their control. If it was me in a terrible state, I would rather be treated for dehydration than suffer. But I am not a pro athlete who pulls himself off his deathbed to race the next day, while doped, in an attempt to deprive someone else of winnings/earnings.

And that to me is where the athlete's responsibility fails. But I also do not pretend to know the pressure by sponsirs/teams/etc to continue.

(I am not talking about true dopers - only athletes caught on valid medical situations)

jcza, Dec 29 2016 10:40

...

...

...

(I am not talking about true dopers - only athletes caught on valid medical situations)

 

Made me smile - classification of dopers. I thought it was simple, you're sick you can't race. 

Patchelicious, Dec 29 2016 10:42

This I think is the main point. A doctor should always have the person's best health issues at heart, and should record it as such. He should also inform the client, especially in a race circumstance whether it is on the banned list or not.

*snip

I agree with this. Its far too easy to simply say that the the doctor cannot be questioned as he must have his patient interest at heart. Agreed he should, but like V12 also said, they are not policemen and cannot force patients to take meds.

 

Therefore at minimum I think the doctor has a obligation to advise his patients about the risks of taking meds, be this health risk or other. 

 

"Here take med option X, it will be the best for you, but if you take it you cannot continue to ride as its on the prohibited list. Or you could rather take med option Y, which will not be as effective as option X, but it is approved."

 

We have spoken about how easy it is to use the SAIDS medication check, both race docs and athletes could use it. Hell, this could be done before the race and the Doc could pack 3 tupperware of meds a Green/Orange/Red one ;)

 

This is of course based on the assumption that the events transpired as Tyronne said it did.

Barend de Arend, Dec 29 2016 10:42

Most top-level pro cycling teams will have a doctor that is very familiar with drugs that are likely to receive a TUE, and work with the UCI and/or WADA in obtaining a short-term TUE for an emergency.

 

Most GPs are not aware.  The process isn't easy for a normal GP or a normal guy in the street.  If "race medic" means a ER24 or other paramedic, then they might not know.

 

However, they should know the drugs prescribed, and should inform the patient of the drugs provided.  At the very least to check for allergies.

Patchelicious, Dec 29 2016 10:43

Made me smile - classification of dopers. I thought it was simple, you're sick you can't race. 

If you want to put people who explicitly take EPO and Blood Transfusions to make themselves fasters into the same box as a guy who gets caught smoking pot at a race, I think a point or two is being missed.

Patchelicious, Dec 29 2016 10:44

Most top-level pro cycling teams will have a doctor that is very familiar with drugs that are likely to receive a TUE, and work with the UCI and/or WADA in obtaining a short-term TUE for an emergency.

 

Most GPs are not aware.  The process isn't easy for a normal GP or a normal guy in the street.  If "race medic" means a ER24 or other paramedic, then they might not know.

 

However, they should know the drugs prescribed, and should inform the patient of the drugs provided.  At the very least to check for allergies.

Yes it is:

 

https://www.drugfree...dication-check/

jcza, Dec 29 2016 10:47

If you want to put people who explicitly take EPO and Blood Transfusions to make themselves fasters into the same box as a guy who gets caught smoking pot at a race, I think a point or two is being missed.

 

Tired of sad stories and lame excuses. If its on the list and your sample is positive collect your punishment. 

pista, Dec 29 2016 10:50

235bf045bda1c103c150fadc2e9f6f0c.png

Says he had food poisoning and was severely dehydrated but managed to finish the stage?

 

I had food poisoning once and didn't have the energy to walk to the Hospital desk.I also dehydrated once in a race and was taken to hospital by ambulance.How on earth did he then finish the stage.

Tumbleweed, Dec 29 2016 11:00

What does '0n0b0pp0pp to "g8 7' mean?

Jaco-fiets, Dec 29 2016 11:01

Says he had food poisoning and was severely dehydrated but managed to finish the stage?

 

I had food poisoning once and didn't have the energy to walk to the Hospital desk.I also dehydrated once in a race and was taken to hospital by ambulance.How on earth did he then finish the stage.

True to this! I had food poisoning once from a BP express pie (back in my student days). Never felt so k@k in my life (think at 1 stage I prayed to die...)

V12man, Dec 29 2016 11:01

Interesting point V12man.

So here's a question I've had running through my head: in this instance would it not have been best if the medic/race doctor had the authority to pull a racer out of the race regardless of the level of he is racing at? Or is that going tad overboard with the race doctor's responsibilities?

Sent from my SM-J200H using Tapatalk

Always going to be a difficult call to make - on some races like the Cape Epic this is effectively in place - they just hospitalise the patient overnight... it would be a miracle to get yourself out on time for the start the next day unless you released yourself AMA.

I suspect they also have some more control during the CE but it will be a difficult call - doctors are not policemen and you might for instance let a patient go back to their accomodation overnight for instance with an instruction to return in the am for further assessment... what happens if they don't come back and carry on? I am pretty sure it can be done but there would have to be clear clinical criteria set and rules in place - not going to be easy at all.