Touch adjust tool now available in limited edition colours

At Touch Bike Parts, based in Cape Town, we aim for functionality, high performance, long term value, and environmental awareness. Limiting replacing items after a few years of hard use, and encouraging you to spend more time efficiently adjusting the fit of your bike to improve your riding is our goal.

 

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Our Touch adjust tool comes in a recyclable high quality cardboard sliding box with a magnet close feature for that slick feel and secondary use in mind for storing small parts, hoping that you can keep using it, and not throw it away!

 

The tool itself is built by you, using stiff 6061-T6 aluminium arms that bolt together using different width bolts, depending on the amount of tools you want to carry. The 2, 3 or 4 width bolts allow 4, 6 or 8 toolbits to be used from the total of 9 provided. All parts are CNC machined for accuracy of precision and fit. The toolbits and bolts are all heat treated stainless steel, while the machined washers are non heat treated stainless steel. All parts are highly corrosion resistant and ready to spend time in that sweaty pocket, wet bag or ocean air for many years, without becoming tarnished and rough to use. Built to last!

 

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We want you to look over your bike and choose which toolbits you need for adjustment, helping you learn about your bike. Building the tool accordingly limits unnecessary tools and the modularity makes it future proof ready for your next bike or parts that you fit. Together with this modularity, worn tool parts can be replaced at minimal cost if that time arrives, therefore keeping your tool in use indefinitely. For the hard to reach bolts on your bike you can also place the needed toolbits against the tool arms to allow for better clearance and reach. The package comes with all parts, ready to build, and is a fun project to do with your kids too! The expanded user experience is part of our product goals.

 

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The 6 toolbit example shown in hand and in the technical drawing weighs only 79 grams and is therefore not very noticeable in the rear pocket of a cycling jersey, and makes it fast and easy to use from there. The compact pivot design of the toolbits saves a lot of weight and keeps the profile slim.

 

Designed for efficiency with the long arms and narrow profile to reach tight spaces on the bicycle, liking it to a mobile workshop on hand during your ride, yet compact and light, the slim shape fitting comfortably into pockets and bags, as well as one's hand.

 

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The long length gives excellent sensitivity to bolt torque, and great leverage, saving you time and energy, especially compared to short multi-tools, allowing one to comfortably unscrew tight through axles for example.

 

Glove friendly and ready to use on the go, the solid pivots, stiff arms, and specially shaped washers that keep the rotation dynamics consistent and controlled, lead to stable and fast use of the tool in any conditions. The open design allows one to easily select and use each toolbit with gloves on, allowing for fast and efficient use, even when one has been riding hard and the hands are tired.

 

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We also believe that the tool has better tool functionality without a chain breaker added to it. Likewise that a separate chain breaker provides better leverage and functionality in use, and would not clutter the Touch adjust tool for the hopefully few times you need to break a chain link during your riding years.

 

We hope you cherish our bicycle tool as much as we do for its entire life!

 

Please visit our website for more information and for purchasing.

 

There are limited edition colour models available online now... Black, green and violet arms!

 

Price is R900 each, for all colour options.

 

 

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71 Comments

DieselnDust, Nov 14 2019 02:17

Chain breaker is important for many people to have. I used multi tools with chain breakers on them over the years, problem I have is that as the narrower chains get stronger (10/11/12 speed), the pins are riveted on so well that unless the chain tool has good leverage it gets really hard to break the pin through the plates. There is usually a lot of leverage available on the pin of the tool to drive forward, but holding onto the small chain tool body is hard work, it wants to twist with the turning of the pin.

But there are some out there that work well all combined when the chain lever body is long enough to hold onto! I still find them cumbersome to use overall, so choose separate tools for better use in what they do in isolation. Thanks for the feedback!

P.s. I also find combined multi tools with chain breakers very heavy, and becomes a solid lump in one of my cycling pockets which I find very off putting. Spreading the items between pockets makes it far less noticeable to me...

 

 

I'd like to see a chain breaker integrated into your current tool architecture but as a separate slide on unit. So using the two chassis plates but with a a gutter that the two toiols can slide into each if one so chooses. I don't oftern carry a chain breaker on a road ride but I do on a MTB ride. So the choice to configure the tool with the chain breaker or not would be great. Using the chassis as the holder also gives the necessary leverage.

 

I can see you have gven this tool a lot of thought so I know you understand what I'm saying.

Thebeaty of your product is that upgrades can be added on later without the owner having to incur the purchase of a totally new tool. I have about 6 multi tools at home as a result of this. Its frustrating and wasteful . Bad Feng Shui.

 

Tools i'd like to see added in future: 

1) Chain Breaker

2) tyre plug driver

3) Disc caliper spreader

4) powerlink breaker

5) Powerlink holder

 

 

these could all be in a separate  chassis 

shaper, Nov 14 2019 02:18

Chain breaker is important for many people to have. I used multi tools with chain breakers on them over the years, problem I have is that as the narrower chains get stronger (10/11/12 speed), the pins are riveted on so well that unless the chain tool has good leverage it gets really hard to break the pin through the plates. There is usually a lot of leverage available on the pin of the tool to drive forward, but holding onto the small chain tool body is hard work, it wants to twist with the turning of the pin.

But there are some out there that work well all combined when the chain lever body is long enough to hold onto! I still find them cumbersome to use overall, so choose separate tools for better use in what they do in isolation. Thanks for the feedback!

P.s. I also find combined multi tools with chain breakers very heavy, and becomes a solid lump in one of my cycling pockets which I find very off putting. Spreading the items between pockets makes it far less noticeable to me...

A chain breaker is the difference between having an issue and fixing it yourself and still enjoying your ride, else ending your ride and calling an uber/wife/friend or potential long walk back to the car.... so is a no brainer.  And for me one tool per bike rather than trying to remember to move a number of tools around depending on the ride.

 

If you want to design a tool and save weight, multi-tools with a 4mm, 5mm or 6mm and maybe a T25 with a chain breaker will be sufficient for most bikes these days and unlikely to be heavy.

 

So if you had a way of incorporating a chain breaker into your 2X option it would be of interest.

 

And I agree with you getting the pins out is getting harder with each new chain I get whether replacing once stretched or through breaking..... but not impossible, even when out on a ride.

TouchBikeParts, Nov 14 2019 03:54

A chain breaker is the difference between having an issue and fixing it yourself and still enjoying your ride, else ending your ride and calling an uber/wife/friend or potential long walk back to the car.... so is a no brainer.  And for me one tool per bike rather than trying to remember to move a number of tools around depending on the ride.

 

If you want to design a tool and save weight, multi-tools with a 4mm, 5mm or 6mm and maybe a T25 with a chain breaker will be sufficient for most bikes these days and unlikely to be heavy.

 

So if you had a way of incorporating a chain breaker into your 2X option it would be of interest.

 

And I agree with you getting the pins out is getting harder with each new chain I get whether replacing once stretched or through breaking..... but not impossible, even when out on a ride.

Hi Shaper and DieselnDust, thanks for the feedback! I understand some people would like one tool with everything on it, including a chain breaker.

I have a very light and functional chain breaker design, but not in production yet... it is a stand alone product that combines another tool with it ;)
Having it part of the Touch adjust tool still makes no real functional sense to me as it makes the tool big and clumsy... and if it means I need to spend time and energy to separate the two to use either of them, it has lost its magic for me.

I agree chain tools are important!! I carry one on every ride for many years now, but only used it once during a ride - I think on someone else's bike haha! Some people may break chains more often, but most people I speak to have only used one on a ride once in 2 years or far less often. Especially if you ride alone a lot, its survival to have one, as long as you know how i to use it...

I will take all perspectives into consideration, but still need to keep the core values of my products within my scope, which is a highly efficient, long and lightweight stand alone toolset that is a pleasure to use for it's core function of adjusting ones bike or taking off through axles etc, and is customisable to your bike and parts used and highly durable/corrosion resistant.

In terms of what I carry on a ride that I must remember, it is quite a few things but easy:
Tool, small pump, plug kit and some extra valve cores for mtb or patch kit with tyre lever for road ride, chain tool, money, phone, keys + food for longer rides.

So amongst what I need to carry, for me to grab the mini chain tool is very easy for each ride... it is in plain sight with all my stuff and gets elastic banded to either my patch kit or plug kit, takes me around 3 seconds to swap it between the two depending on road or mtb ride.

I carry things in my cycling pockets as I hate wearing hydration packs, they limit my body english on mtb rides - each to their own though, whatever works for you.

The integration of many tools in one item I find makes the use of them less than ideal... especially if one or two of the tools is used only very seldom. Bulky tools also often cant reach certain bolts on the bike etc, and can also scratch nearby surfaces of the bike and parts.

The screwdriver tip spoke key works well as a disc pad opener ;) one can get them open a little and then follow up with 2.5mm Allen key.

Ultimately it is the riders choice to build the Touch adjust tool how they like and adapt it to different bikes over the years, or even slim it down for a race if needed, build it back up for longer rides in the mountains.

It is not a do everything tool that weighs a lot. There are many of those tools already in existence... some may be lighter than others with less overall functions, some people may like using them, I dont! And many people may not like to use them either ideally... but knowing they have everything is safety for them, no problem if this is what is best for you.
 

However the Touch adjust tool in terms of using it functionally I feel gets close to having all the tools you need in a personal setup with long leverage setup, without the heft of workshop size tools. 




 

T-Bob, Nov 14 2019 04:19

Maybe I've had bad multitools in the past but I've not had a chain breaker on a multi tool that has worked well. I carry a seperate Mini Chainbreaker from KMC and it's great. 25g and has one purpose. Any chain tool has to have a replaceable pin. 

 

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Shebeen, Nov 14 2019 04:28

Maybe I've had bad multitools in the past but I've not had a chain breaker on a multi tool that has worked well. I carry a seperate Mini Chainbreaker from KMC and it's great. 25g and has one purpose. Any chain tool has to have a replaceable pin. 

 

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that is a smart piece of metal!

TouchBikeParts, Nov 14 2019 07:46

I'd like to see a chain breaker integrated into your current tool architecture but as a separate slide on unit. So using the two chassis plates but with a a gutter that the two toiols can slide into each if one so chooses. I don't oftern carry a chain breaker on a road ride but I do on a MTB ride. So the choice to configure the tool with the chain breaker or not would be great. Using the chassis as the holder also gives the necessary leverage.

 

I can see you have gven this tool a lot of thought so I know you understand what I'm saying.

Thebeaty of your product is that upgrades can be added on later without the owner having to incur the purchase of a totally new tool. I have about 6 multi tools at home as a result of this. Its frustrating and wasteful . Bad Feng Shui.

 

Tools i'd like to see added in future: 

1) Chain Breaker

2) tyre plug driver

3) Disc caliper spreader

4) powerlink breaker

5) Powerlink holder

 

 

these could all be in a separate  chassis 

Hi DieselnDust, thanks for the feedback again... thought I would add some answers here too.

For the tyre plug driver, having it as a folding part on the tool can be dangerous as it can fold onto ones fingers under pressure... but I have an idea for one (separate again, but more useful than current ones).

For powerlink tools, during a ride I don't see the necessity. If one breaks a chain, one needs to remove outer plates using chain breaker to get two female portions of the chain and fit new powerlink, using pedal pressure one can snap it into place easily. One can easily do this with chain off the front chainring then pull chain onto the ring after the link is in place but not fully clipped in. At least this is my experience working on bicycles for a lot of my life... I like to carry as little as possible, but still have highly functional and durable and lightweight tools/gear.

I will see when I can get my chain breaker to market... busy with performance MTB XC-trail/Enduro/DH product now, excited to get it out there asap!

And as you mentioned, limiting the need to buy extra tools to work with new bikes and parts is my goal!



 

ChrisF, Nov 14 2019 07:58

It is obviously impractical to carry tools for "all eventualities" ....

 

But the K2C, S2C, W2W, etc crowd certainly would want enough of a range to be reasonably self sufficient ... 

 

 

At the 2019 Fine Breede fun ride a kid fell and damaged the rear derailure ... locking the chain and wheel .... he was literally carrying his bike back to the start.  Thanks the Wolf Tooth chain tool I was able to remove his chain quickly, and he could get on his bike and freewheel 3km back to the start.  The truly nice thing about the Wolf Tooth tool is that it is also your tire levers (taking up less space than traditional tire levers), AND it is storage space for spare quick links

 

 

This is one game where there certainly is no one single answer that fits all.  The further we go off the beaten track, and the further away from support the bigger the tool bag ....

 

 

That said, I DO like the idea of the Touch tool  .... for those rides where I dont want to carry a ton of tools ....

DieselnDust, Nov 14 2019 08:36

It is obviously impractical to carry tools for "all eventualities" ....

 

But the K2C, S2C, W2W, etc crowd certainly would want enough of a range to be reasonably self sufficient ... 

 

 

At the 2019 Fine Breede fun ride a kid fell and damaged the rear derailure ... locking the chain and wheel .... he was literally carrying his bike back to the start.  Thanks the Wolf Tooth chain tool I was able to remove his chain quickly, and he could get on his bike and freewheel 3km back to the start.  The truly nice thing about the Wolf Tooth tool is that it is also your tire levers (taking up less space than traditional tire levers), AND it is storage space for spare quick links

 

 

This is one game where there certainly is no one single answer that fits all.  The further we go off the beaten track, and the further away from support the bigger the tool bag ....

 

 

That said, I DO like the idea of the Touch tool  .... for those rides where I dont want to carry a ton of tools ....

 

 

Yeah hence I like the Touch so much. Even if Raoul does not use the tools or see a need i would like to convince him theres a market for a high quality tool that allows the user to configure it in whatever way they please for the eventuality and the choices could/should include those tools we may never need but for that one day.

 

I've owned a headdoctor for some 16years. Its seen occasional use but at WIne2Whales it was super busy on my teamies bike. Flip it was an unchained melody. Chain breaker was the saviour and I was tempted to throw the light weigh parktool in my back pocket instead. Glad I didn't. 

 

I like that KMC chain breaker option. Who does those beauts in SA because I think it may be the answer in combination with the right TOUCH

TouchBikeParts, Nov 14 2019 09:53

Yeah hence I like the Touch so much. Even if Raoul does not use the tools or see a need i would like to convince him theres a market for a high quality tool that allows the user to configure it in whatever way they please for the eventuality and the choices could/should include those tools we may never need but for that one day.

 

I've owned a headdoctor for some 16years. Its seen occasional use but at WIne2Whales it was super busy on my teamies bike. Flip it was an unchained melody. Chain breaker was the saviour and I was tempted to throw the light weigh parktool in my back pocket instead. Glad I didn't. 

 

I like that KMC chain breaker option. Who does those beauts in SA because I think it may be the answer in combination with the right TOUCH

Hi again! 

I am willing to develop more products as people wish, if you have a million rand spare to give me I will design and produce them over the next year no problemo hehe.

I still stand that I cant see the real benefit of having all the tools in one big bundle... the more one tries to integrate the tools, the less functional their performance becomes and the more they may infringe on the ergonomics etc. Similar to one bike that does everything, great, but not that enjoyable or good at a specific job. I think the way products have become more do everything in one shape/size, the less of a good job they do -  but the sales benefits on paper are big. And the fact that one may not use them often, why put them all in one tool... keep them separate, lightweight, small and easy to store and replace if one of them breaks or wears out.

There is a lot of competition in the market for large multi tools with everything on them... and I can see why people buy them, however, the bulk, weight and clumsiness of them is very off putting to me.

I have spent around 30 years of my life working on bikes with everything from original Cool Tool, to loose Allen keys, various multi tools, workshop tools etc. And seeing tools round off, corrode, fall apart, break, while often being heavy, short, bulky, thrown away because one toolbit was broken etc, I needed to try find a better solution... something that bridged an "L" bend Allen key simplicity and agility, with a workshop "L" reach and leverage and a multi tool setup for ultimate compact riding use satisfaction, durability, lightweight, slimness, customisation etc... bringing a workshop tools library of tools needed to work efficiently on all the bolts into a riding tool.

I think the key part of Touch adjust tool is also in the way it can be used. Easy to spin in the hand, twisting the end like a butterfly nut with no protruding pieces dragging on the hand or gloves, using extended to reach that post mount disc brake bolt behind the seatstay, feeling the torque while tightening a clamp onto carbon  parts because of the length and rigidity of all the parts - its feedback is great, all able to do this with gloves on while hands are freezing cold because it is easy to get the toolbits out from the frame etc, not needing to try pry out a toolbit from a closed framework.

I know I cant please everyone : ) But I try to solve many problems with current tools on the market that I have noticed, and am aware that one needs other tools to ride with too, and there are many chain breakers, tyre levers, plug tools out there that are amazing. I hope to get my other ideas out there soon, but it takes lots of time and finances to produce all of them in the high quantities that the factories require... am very happy to get this feedback, and hope that I can implement it in the future!

The tool market is over-saturated, if you look online in Europe for example and see the amount of tools available, many of them trying to out do each other on qty of functions etc, or how small they can get, or new functions that don't really hit the mark, I think the core function of them is being whittled away to enable one to comfortably work on a bicycle anywhere on this planet with a multitude of environments, weather conditions, bike designs etc.
That is my take on it, or my expression of my experience with bicycle tools. Nothing is right or wrong choice, but glad I can get this tool out there, been a long journey of bike tools in my life haha.
 

BigDL, Nov 14 2019 11:44

Hi,

Are you considering international shipping or do you have a distributor in the UK?

Rocket-Boy, Nov 15 2019 12:01

Hi!
The toolbits start off as 420 stainless steel rod, CNC lathed, then CNC machined for the pivot and tip area, then heat treated to 50 HRC, then tumble polished for the finish... so they are hard, very corrosion resistant and not brittle at all. Bolts are made with same material and heat treatment.

Tool steel is general collection of alloyed steels that harden from various processes, depending on the use they vary a lot. For example, tool steel made for a file is extremely hard but brittle, it snaps under pressure, but can keep a sharp edge better than a softer steel, but the softer steel will not snap as easily, such as used for Allen keys etc. 

As someone who understands the process I can say that is an immense amount of work.

Finding the correct blend of ductile vs durable is difficult and takes a lot of R&D work.

 

Its much easier to understand high quality workmanship like this when it is in your hands. 

AdamA, Nov 15 2019 06:17

If I could make a suggestion....

 

if you make an option to buy extra set of side covers and 1 extra bit, then the uses could build 2 permanent tools and then carry one on short rides and 2 on long rides with out having to reconstruct it each time.

 

Great product. 

Good luck

Christie, Nov 15 2019 06:39

I always take a chain tool on mtb rides.
(Buy not road)

I like having all the tools stored in 1 bundle, to be able to grab quickly out of the Camelbak. They dont all have to be stuck together, just packed so.

DieselnDust, Nov 15 2019 06:53

I always take a chain tool on mtb rides.
(Buy not road)

I like having all the tools stored in 1 bundle, to be able to grab quickly out of the Camelbak. They dont all have to be stuck together, just packed so.

 exactly

so i'd be happy with a second tool contained the otherstuff. I'll make my own holder

TouchBikeParts, Nov 15 2019 07:28

Hi,

Are you considering international shipping or do you have a distributor in the UK?

Hi BigDL, I can ship internationally... please email me on info@bike-touch.com.... I'll get your location and quote for delivery (it varies from R700-1200 in my experience - can also send a few to make it more worthwhile as quite a few can fit in A3 bag).

I am discussing with some people in Europe to have online shop/distribution that side. Currently, the cost of the tool is very high to produce, so selling to distributor that then sells to shops would mean the retail price will get much higher to make it feasible for them... and for me. Shops want to have high markup on accessories etc. At the moment the retail price is already making people baulk, so selling direct seems best option to make it feasible for the customer.

TouchBikeParts, Nov 15 2019 07:36

If I could make a suggestion....

 

if you make an option to buy extra set of side covers and 1 extra bit, then the uses could build 2 permanent tools and then carry one on short rides and 2 on long rides with out having to reconstruct it each time.

 

Great product. 

Good luck

Hi AdamA!

Yes, I have got many ideas of how to sell all the parts separately, even shops to have all the parts and customers to have them custom built for their bike etc. (Edit - to be honest, making the decision on what to sell as a toolset took me a long time - so many options of what to provide, how many tools to make from a kit etc.)

Your idea of them used as two tools is very much like my original concept I did 9 years ago... I had a stacking design using magnets... but the project got steered to its current form for various reasons : )

I also have another idea that may come into fruition for a really small/light cost effective version using just 2 or so toolbits... I will let you know! If it is something you would like to try, please keep in touch - if you buy a toolset, I can send you some extra parts to test it out using the toolbits.

At the moment I don't have many spares to use, just complete sets, so am ambivalent to split them up unless its urgent need.

Thanks for the comments and suggestion!

 

morneS555, Nov 15 2019 07:43

I'd like to see a chain breaker integrated into your current tool architecture but as a separate slide on unit. So using the two chassis plates but with a a gutter that the two toiols can slide into each if one so chooses. I don't oftern carry a chain breaker on a road ride but I do on a MTB ride. So the choice to configure the tool with the chain breaker or not would be great. Using the chassis as the holder also gives the necessary leverage.

 

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shouldn't be that difficult to design something modular to fit the touch...


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hansolo, Nov 15 2019 07:56

I was really impressed with the build quality when I saw this at my LBS but I have a OneUp EDC tool. My friends gave me for my birthday lives on my bike, it's very handy with a chainbreaker and spare links.

TouchBikeParts, Nov 15 2019 08:20

shouldn't be that difficult to design something modular to fit the touch...

Hi Morne,

Thanks!

I am very aware of all the tools out in the market... I spent many months dealing with the factory that make Topeak tools, but they could not do what I wanted in the end.

If I wanted to sell a product that is similar to what is out there already, I would just add my logo onto an existing design, many people do this in the bicycle industry with various products... It is just not the direction I want to go. Unless I feel I can evolve a products use/experience, I don't want to make it as there is so much choice out there already!

From my experience with modern bike technology, tyre levers and chain tools are seldom used on a ride... but they are needed!
Back in the day before tubeless and better chain production techniques I would be using tyre levers and chain tools a lot more often... but these days it is very much only on occasion - I don't even carry a tyre lever when I mtb.

The tool that one uses most, and that I want to encourage people to use, is a toolset to adjust their bike during rides.
Tweak that bar position, saddle tilt, brake lever angle, shifter position, pedal cleat tension, caliper position to stop rubbing, seatpost height, tighten headset etc.

 

I see so many people riding their bikes and complaining of comfort issues and their cleats too tight or loose. When what they need to do is start playing with their setup more, get accustomed to the different positions one adjusts the various parts on the bike etc, this all makes a huge difference to the riding feel, comfort, speed and handling one can manage on a bicycle.

The Touch adjust tool is the tool for this... it is designed to be quickly used to adjust the bike on the go, and the pleasure of using it I hope encourages people to play with their bike setup. Fixing a bike on the trail is hopefully not that common, bicycle technology is really good these days, and unless the bike has been assembled and maintained badly, or very cheap parts used, not a lot goes wrong on most rides.

For me, if I have to spend a minute just to get to my tool, and then take glove off to use it properly... sorry, it is just too much time and effort, and limits me wanting to adjust the bike.

I wonder how many people have ridden their bikes for months where during the ride they think, when I get home I will adjust my bar or saddle etc, and then when you get home, you never do it, one forgets!
 

I do plan to write some articles on bike setup on my website to help people understand more about this. And open to run a workshop for bicycle setup where people can start understanding how bar tilt can change your whole ride feel - just a small example. Suspension setup, tyre pressure, derailleur adjustments, how to tighten a headset, saddle positioning and how it affects ones riding when one changes it.

I see riders with bars tilted down on their mtb... its terrible on the wrists. Brake levers tilted flat and too close to the grip area so the hand is so crunched in when trying to brake, especially when they stand up. Shift levers so close to grip that the hand rubs on it.

Many riders know how to set their bike up, but majority don't... and I hope that my Touch adjust tool will encourage one to start this process from the fact that one needs to build the tool according to what your bike needs. You will need to check your bike out carefully and make the best decision!

I know this comment is bit off topic, but just trying to show the understanding behind the relationship one can have with ones bike and the tools and where I see my brand going with the products I will release - not just tools : )

shaper, Nov 15 2019 08:27

On all my bikes I get a proper bike fit done, whether road, tri or MTB.  Tweaking a setup on a ride will not happen.  The tools are there ONLY if something comes loose and needs tightening or fixing. 99% of the time, the tool is not required, but there is that 1% when it is needed.

 

Edit: will also add that I build all of my bikes and change bolts so that i only need a 4 & 5mm allen key, a chain breaker and tyre lever, so can reduce my tools down to bare minimum

TouchBikeParts, Nov 15 2019 09:35

On all my bikes I get a proper bike fit done, whether road, tri or MTB.  Tweaking a setup on a ride will not happen.  The tools are there ONLY if something comes loose and needs tightening or fixing. 99% of the time, the tool is not required, but there is that 1% when it is needed.

 

Edit: will also add that I build all of my bikes and change bolts so that i only need a 4 & 5mm allen key, a chain breaker and tyre lever, so can reduce my tools down to bare minimum

That's fine if you trust that other people know how YOUR bike should be setup for your OWN BODY haha! I don't know how it could be accurate to be honest! How one rides and handles a bike and body movement is very different for everyone... it is something one needs to cultivate awareness of. I guarantee you all the top pros adjust their bikes a lot to find the best fit and handling of their machines while out on the trail or road.

Good idea to change bolts... but many adjustments to various parts are definitely smaller than 4mm Allen keys...
Glad you have found what works for you : )

shaper, Nov 15 2019 10:17

That's fine if you trust that other people know how YOUR bike should be setup for your OWN BODY haha! I don't know how it could be accurate to be honest! How one rides and handles a bike and body movement is very different for everyone... it is something one needs to cultivate awareness of. I guarantee you all the top pros adjust their bikes a lot to find the best fit and handling of their machines while out on the trail or road.

Good idea to change bolts... but many adjustments to various parts are definitely smaller than 4mm Allen keys...
Glad you have found what works for you : )

Find a reputable fitter and discuss riding style and setup, so that bike is set up for your own body.  Bikes often change over the years, so does body shape and flexibility, so bike set up will also change and checked with the bike change.  Even if I don't change bikes,.I do go back every 18 months or so for a check and possible modification as I get older

 

But as mentioned and I think you are looking into it... having a number of additional tools that you can buy individually and separate from current, so that over time you can modify the touch adjust to your needs.  The casing is in essence is the toolbox and you choose (adjust) what tools you want to put inside it.... now that would be cool and hopefully you will develop something along those lines.  Good luck!

DieselnDust, Nov 15 2019 10:23

On all my bikes I get a proper bike fit done, whether road, tri or MTB.  Tweaking a setup on a ride will not happen.  The tools are there ONLY if something comes loose and needs tightening or fixing. 99% of the time, the tool is not required, but there is that 1% when it is needed.

 

Edit: will also add that I build all of my bikes and change bolts so that i only need a 4 & 5mm allen key, a chain breaker and tyre lever, so can reduce my tools down to bare minimum

 

I hear you 

 

 

 

That's fine if you trust that other people know how YOUR bike should be setup for your OWN BODY haha! I don't know how it could be accurate to be honest! How one rides and handles a bike and body movement is very different for everyone... it is something one needs to cultivate awareness of. I guarantee you all the top pros adjust their bikes a lot to find the best fit and handling of their machines while out on the trail or road.

Good idea to change bolts... but many adjustments to various parts are definitely smaller than 4mm Allen keys...
Glad you have found what works for you : )

 

 

and I hear you too,

 

 

I'm a bit of a fiddler when it comes to my set up. Depending onhow much stretching i've done I will feel very different on the same bike form day to day. So it often takes about 10min for me to get comfortable on the bike but I often think about raising the saddle one day lowering it the next.

I tilt the bars forward or  back rearward on the roadie if my shoulders are tight.

 On the the mtb I move the brake levers with the shifter up and down all the time as well as the saddle ( why I'll be first in the queue for a dropper that has an adjustable end point  to change saddle height quickly without tools.

 

I like where Touch Adjust is going. The tool may not tick every box for me right now but I'm excited for where the owner wants to take it.

 

Many great products start life as a solution to a problem the inventor felt was worthy of solving. Eventually if the inventor  wants the company to grow and remain relevant it needs to offer products that solve more problems and those of a broader audience. 

 

So keep it please and continue to evolve the product  :clap:

TouchBikeParts, Nov 15 2019 10:50

Find a reputable fitter and discuss riding style and setup, so that bike is set up for your own body.  Bikes often change over the years, so does body shape and flexibility, so bike set up will also change and checked with the bike change.  Even if I don't change bikes,.I do go back every 18 months or so for a check and possible modification as I get older

 

But as mentioned and I think you are looking into it... having a number of additional tools that you can buy individually and separate from current, so that over time you can modify the touch adjust to your needs.  The casing is in essence is the toolbox and you choose (adjust) what tools you want to put inside it.

I am a reputable fitter for me, the best one actually haha.

Having their opinion on how it should fit or handle is just that, an opinion based on their experience and what they have read and seen happen.
The technology is useful to get one into a healthy position though, I don't disagree. For some people that lack the sensitivity to adjust their position, then bike fitters are very beneficial, but is just a starting point I feel. Dealing with physical discrepancies is useful to have dealt with professionally, like foot or leg differences from left/right etc. 

But much like talking about geometry of a bike, it really depends on many things, what is important and how the bike fits one from the start.

I agree, ones body/fitness levels change a lot and I compensate my saddle position a lot for this. It is something that I feel is important to learn oneself. I have done a ton of research into bike fitting over the years. I have designed frames for around 7 years of my life and before that I was reading up on all the info, it was my job to understand how the body fits onto bikes and reading much information, there was a lot of information that did not make sense, many people saying that a lot of it does not make logical sense etc. There is a lot of moneymaking in bike fit schemes around the world, it's a big business! It is evolving however, better information being made available, but yeah... I take it all with a big pinch of salt. There are benefits to power output etc, but in terms of general fit and handling on the bike, that is very personal and feel that the dynamics of tweaking it when on a ride and warmed up, pushing hard etc is most important. That is when you notice the difference, not so much in a static room scenario.

If people became more sensitive to what their body is telling them, they will learn a lot more than from another person.

I do think that bike fitters are important to get you to a certain position, but from there, tweaking the position, and the handling of the bike is up to oneself. Other people cannot do it for you, just give some guidelines and point out what you maybe have done that could be bad, or that could maybe improve it, but the proof is in the pudding of trying things oneself and seeing the result first hand during a ride.

 

For me, the quill stem on my steel road bike is awesome, raising or lowering the stem by 1mm makes a big difference to my balance and weight distribution and handling... these kinds of things a bike fitter cannot tell. Only on a ride will you feel it.

Touch adjust may expand... but chain tool is definitely on the cards!

MTB Trail Stem is next product I will release. Very excited to get it out there.

Spinnekop, Nov 15 2019 11:45

What bikeshops in Pretoria is suppose to have stock of this?  

Will you guys be at the 94.7 expo?

:thumbup: